Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free
Lecciones para aprender y mejorar tú inglés. English lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and listening skills.

If you are a new listener to this award-winning podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.
Grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/


In this episode: Speaking about Future Plans


Listener Feedback: Antonio: Hello Reza and Craig, I would like to convey you (tell you) that this is, in my humble opinion, one of the best podcasts ever on your site.
I really appreciate your help and having said that, I'm not underestimating the rest of your podcasts at all, they are all awesome too.
I wish you staying with us your listener much longer (I hope to be listening to you more in the future).
Thank you.
Antonio

Episode 80 - Confusing words ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/12/06/confusing-verbs-like-say-tell-remember-remind-win-earn-etc-airc80/ )


Speaking about the Future

We spoke about the future: present continuous / going to / will in episode 21
( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/04/28/craigs-going-to-have-steak-rezall-have-the-fish-airc21/ )

to recap = to summarize (resumir) / a recap = un resumen

PRESENT SIMPLE:

We use the present simple for something scheduled or arranged (bus, train and plane timetables, school and college timetables, shop opening times etc):

The train to Barcelona leaves tomorrow at 9 o'clock.

What time does the bank open tomorrow? - It opens at 9.

When do you study French? My class starts at 2 o'clock.

What time does your plane leave when you go to Belfast? - It leaves at about half past five.

When's your birthday?

PRESENT CONTINUOUS:

We can use the present continuous for future plans or arrangements:

We're having a podcaster's Meetup tomorrow. Are you going?

I'm going away for Christmas this year.

What are you doing for Christmas? (Not: XWhat will you doX) - Reza is visiting his mother in Ireland.


We can use "(be) going to" to talk about our future plans and intentions:

"We're going to have a podcaster's Meetup tomorrow." / "We're going to go away for Christmas this year." /

"Reza's going to visit his family." / "What are you going to do?"

 

"Bob is a medical student. He's going to be a doctor." (You CANNOT say X"He's being a doctor."X) - It's a future INTENTION which hasn't been arranged yet).


We also use "(be) going to" When we can see that something is likely to happen:

Look at those clouds in the sky. I think it's going to rain.

Look at that idiot on the bike. He's going to fall off in a minute!

Be careful! You are going to spill your coffee. (to spill = derramar, verter)

PRESENT PERFECT:

You can also use the present perfect tense to speak about your plans:

We've decided to go to Taiwan for Christmas.
We've settled on Taiwan, after all. (to settle on = decidirse por)
We've opted for a holiday in Taiwan. (to opt for = optar por )
We've booked a trip to Taiwan.


WILL:

We use will to talk about the future in specific situations:

When we make predictions:
Do you think it will rain next week?
It will (It'll) be a nice day tomorrow. (It'll be sunny)
Next week it'll be windy.
I’m sure you will enjoy the film.

To make offers and promises:
I promise I'll help you later.
I'll see you tomorrow. (I promise to see you tomorrow)

Use will to express facts and talk about things that are true.
In a few days it'll be 2016.
If you don't drink water, you will die.

We can use will to mean 'want to' or 'be willing to' (willing to = dispuesto a):
I hope you'll come to the Meeting tomorrow night. (Meetup.com - http://www.meetup.com/Valencia-Podcasting-Meetup/events/226862315/ )
Martin said he will help us record a future podcast.

Use will to talk about decisions made at the time of speaking:
I'll have the fish.

 

Italki are offering a special deal to listeners of Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig – 100 free italki credits (ITCs) when you sign up for their paid service. Buy 1 get 1 free!

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Reza and I want to thank italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

 


We often use verbs like "would like", "plan", "want", "intend", "mean", "hope", "expect" to talk about the future:

I’d like to go to a conference in Birmingham next year.
Is there anything you hope to do this year? - Reza hopes to lose some weight. Craig plans to lose weight also.
Do you expect anything to change regarding your flat this year?
Is there anything that you intend to buy this year?.


We use modals "may", "might", and "could" when we are not sure about the future:

Reza might change many things in his flat.
He could re-wire the flat.
He might meet his friends at the cinema tomorrow.
Craig may get more organised next year. He might continue the same way as this year.


We can use "should" if we think something is likely to happen:

We should have finished recording these podcasts by lunchtime.
We should be home before midnight tomorrow.


Clauses with time words:
CAREFUL!!!In clauses with words like "when", "after", "before" and "until" we often use a present tense to talk about the future:

I’ll phone you when I get home. (not Xwill getX)
I won't order the product until I know the price.
They are signing the contract after they have spoken with their lawyer.
Remember to clean behind your ears before you visit your grandmother tomorrow.

We can use the future continuous instead of the present continuous or going to for emphasis when we are talking about plans, arrangements and intentions:

We’ll be eating at 2 o'clock.
What do you think you'll be doing this time next year? Craig will be recording another Christmas podcast?


How to ask people about their plans:

What are your plans for next year?

Have you decided what you're doing for Easter or Fallas?

What are you up to next weekend?

Are you going to carry on podcasting with me next year, Reza?


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to tell us about your future plans and goals. What do you intend to do in 2016?

Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

 


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

On next week's episode: Getting Married and Wedding vocabulary

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC83_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:00pm CET

If you are a new listener to this award-winning podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.
Grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

 


In this episode: It's Christmas time!!

Feedback:
From Gustavo (email)
Hi Craig and Reza, it has been an amazing discovering for me your podcasts. I listen to them when I go and come to work by car - almost everyday- and they have the perfect length for my route.
(A question: can I use the pronoun "they" with the noun "podcasts"? Is it correct?).
On the other hand, (Another thing is, also, By the way) the content of the programs is very interesting and useful, your pronunciation is clear and your sense of humour quite funny.
Congratulations on the program and thank you for your educational work.
A big hug for the both of you.

Feedback from Mr. S. Claus (letter down the chimney)
Mr. Claus says: Ho Ho Ho Ho! Thank you for your podcasts.
My reindeers really like listening to Reza and Craig as they pull the sleigh through the snow here in Lapland. Rudolph would like to ask
if you can sing one verse of the song 'Rudoph the red nose reindeer'. It would make his Christmas very happy and full of good cheer.
Keep up the good work in 2016.
Un abrazo. Your red-nosed friend Santa Claus.

"Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
Had a very shiny nose.
And if you ever saw it
You would even say it glows.

All of the other reindeer
Used to laugh and call him names.
They never let poor Rudolph
Join in any reindeer games."


Christmas vocabulary in Episodes 10 and Christmas customs in episode 39
( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/01/31/aprender-ingles-con-reza-y-craig-10/ )
( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/12/25/it-seems-to-be-the-verb-to-get-and-merry-christmas-airc39/ )


Vocabulary Review:

December 24th – Christmas Eve
December 25th – Christmas Day
Boxing Day = el 26 de diciembre, día festivo en Gran Bretaña
January 1st – New Year’s Day
December 31st – New Year’s Eve
January 6th – The day of the (three) Kings, or “Epiphany”
wrapping paper = papel de envolver/papel de regalo
¡Feliz Navidad! – Happy Christmas! / Merry Christmas! - "We wish you a merry Chrismas and a happy New Year."
¡Feliz Navidad y Próspero Año Nuevo! – "All the best for the coming year."
¡Felices fiestas! – Season’s greetings! Happy holidays!
Salud! – Cheers! (“Slancha” in Ireland)


Italki are offering a special deal to listeners of Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig – 100 free italki credits (ITCs) when you sign up for their paid service. Buy 1 get 1 free!

Find a teacher and improve your speaking with italki

Reza and I want to thank italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig


More vocabulary:

Father Christmas (Santa Claus)
Christmas card (list) - We spoke about sending Christmas cards in episode 79 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/11/29/what-to-write-in-greeting-cards-airc79/ )
Christmas collocations: Christmas tree, Christmas pudding, Christmas cake, Christmas presents, Christmas carols, Christmas stocking, Christmas lights, Christmas ornaments, Christmas crackers
Christmas candle (Vela de navidad). Candle = vela (la vela de un barco se llama "sail")
tinsel (oropel, espumillón)
mistletoe - muérdago
holly - acebo
manger - pesebre, comedero
sleigh - trineo
shepherd (a keeper of sheep) - pastor, pastora

A Christmas Poem

Christmas comes only once a year,
And before you know it it’s already here.
Family fights and Christmas Eve stress,
Leaves me exhausted and praying for rest.
Thinking what presents to buy is quite hard,
But worse is the damage to my credit card.
I’m not complaining, I like wrapping presents,
But let’s forget turkey and start stuffing pheasants.
Turkey is dry and not very nice,
Why not paella at a much better price?
Tradition is fine, if it give satisfaction,
But the best thing about Christmas is human interaction.


Chistmas Riddles – Adivinanzas de Navidad
• Whats the best thing to put into a Christmas cake ?
- Your teeth

• What comes at the end of Christmas Day?
- The letter "Y"!

• What sort of ball doesn't bounce?
- A snowball!

• How do you know when there is a snowman in your bed?
- You wake up wet!

• How do snowmen greet each other?
- Ice to meet you!

What do you call a deer with one eye?
No idea (no eye deer)

What do you call a dead deer with no eyes?
Still no idea (still no eye deer)

What's your favourite CHristmas song?

I'll put links to some popular Christmas songs with lyrics in the shownotes to this episode on the website at inglespodcast/82

Idina Menzel Ft. & Michael Buble - Baby It's Cold Outside: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnH_RGyzbSU

8 Days of Christmas - Destiny's Child http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_YXAe3_Ie8

The Pogues - Fairytale of New York http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pv0hlbWpa1w

Driving Home For Christmas - Chris Rea http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_04WT87e8s

Christmas Day - Dido http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=numk7Aa8o7o

All I want for Christmas is You - Maria Carey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tL6f6HqrHZY

Happy Christmas (War is Over) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4u489MkaV4

Do They Know It's Christmas - Band Aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AcD7hho9fs

We Are The World - USA for Africa http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2W4-0qUdHY&feature=related

Christmas is All Around - Billy Mack http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUFqlozV4zU

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas – Frank Sinatra https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jsh_Hk_D6z8

Thank God It's Christmas - Queen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMpg8vNRZHg

It's Christmas Time Again - Backstreet Boys http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XUZyWKeh_Y

Jingle Bells (to be sung when drunk!) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2EZrsB5a2I

We Wish You A Merry Christmas http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVKRVM1guP0

Nat King Cole- The Christmas Song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucYNMkjxSto

 

...and now it's your turn to practise your English.

Tell us about your Christmas and practise your speaking. What's your favourite Christmas song? Does it hold any special memories for you?
Go to https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast and record your voice (only 90 seconds)

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

We'll put a collection of Christmas pop songs with lyrics in English on our website at inglespodcast.com/82
While you're there on the website, why not subscribe to our newsletter and we'll give you a monthly summary of all the podcasts we produce in 2016.

On next week's episode: Speaking about the future and future plans

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC82_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:30pm CET

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.


In this episode: British and American English pronunciation differences

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

 

Listener Feedback: Elisa, Finland:
Hi again,
I hope you are both well!
Really interesting topic and you gave us many fantastic tips and examples. Thanks. (How to start a conversation and make small talk - inglespodcast.com/77)
And I'll attempt to remember not trying (to try) to brake the ice by saying " Hi, nice day for it ;) Sorry, but have I met you before? " It definitely would be skating on thin ice ;)

Patreon update: 7 patrons donating (in total) $9.70 per month We need $100 per month to pay for full transcriptions of each episode:
Thanks to our wonderful patrons Daniel Contreras Aladro, Armando Agudelo, Manuel Tarazoma, Arlem Lara, Sara Jarabo, Mamen and My good friend
Corey Finneran from IvyEnvy.com
If you would like to support us on patreon, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast

Email from Ainhoa
What does TO FIGURE OUT mean?
To ‘figure it out’ means to “solve or discover the cause of a problem.”
In British English, I would say ‘work it out” Example: “Don’t worry about lunch tomorrow when your family comes to visit. We’ll figure it out/work it out. We can get a Chinese takeaway.”

“Why are we paying so much money for the electricity bill? I can’t figure it out!” (to figure out = resolver, solucionar)

Hi Reza and Craig,
congratulations for your great job (on your great work)! you've found the perfect combination of learning English and entertainment; I really love your podcasts.
I have pronunciation doubts about the words "tomatoes" and "potatoes" because I've heard different ways of pronunciation of both words, which is the correct one?.
Finally, I send you (I'm sending you) a proverb in English that I've learned in English class when I was at school, it says: "It takes two to make a quarrel".
Thank you again and please, keep on podcasting,

(It takes two to tango - this cannot happen without more than one person)
- When you want to emphasize that both people involved in a difficult situation must accept the blame.
"My friends are getting a divorce and there's a really bad atmosphere between them. It takes two to tango.


Italki are offering a special deal to listeners of Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig – 100 free italki credits (ITCs) when you sign up for their paid service. Buy 1 get 1 free!

Find a teacher and improve your speaking with italki

Reza and I want to thank italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig


British and American English pronunciation differences

We spoke about British American English in Episode 16 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/03/05/craig-said-that-he-would-make-the-tea-airc16/ )

Vitamin - VIT-a-min (UK); VITE-a-min (US)
Aluminium - al-loo-MIN-ee-um (UK); al-LOO-min-um (US)
Privacy - PRIV-a-see (UK); PRIAV-a-see (US)
schedule - SHED-ual (UK); SKED-ual (US)
Garage - GARE-idge (UK); ga-RAHJ (US)
Advertisement - ad-VERT-iz-ment (UK); AD-ver-tize-ment (US) Brits often shorten this to ADVERT
(Change in stress sometimes: GARE-idge (UK); ga-RAHJ (US), ad-VERT-iz-ment (UK); AD-ver-tize-ment (US), BA-llet (US); baLLET (US), AD-ult (UK); ad-ULT (US)
Herb - HERB (UK); ERB (US)
Oregano - o-re-GA-no (UK); o-RE-ga-no (US)
Water - WAH-ta (UK); WODDER (US) - 'T' in the middle of the word sounds like a 'D' in American English: better, writing, bottom
The 'R' sound at the end of words is stronger in American English: water, mother, teacher, bar, were, chair etc

Sometimes, the letter 'A' is pronounced differently: class, after, example, laugh, can't


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to practise your pronunciation. Go to https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast and record the list of words in this episode.
It can be in American English or British English pronunciation - or both. We don't mind, as long as you practise your speaking.

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


On next week's episode: Reza and Craig's Christmas Special

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC81_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:58pm CET

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.


In this episode: Confusing verbs (say-tell, speak-talk, listen-hear)


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


Listener Feedback:

RAUL (from Valencia)
when do you use "realize", "notice" " find out" I think all of them mean the same. Realize and notice es darse cuenta, find out puede ser averiguar o darse cuenta. It's a mess!

"Realize" means to know and understand something in your mind. It's a cognitive event. "I realized she didn't love me anymore."

"Notice" means to see, hear or feel something. It's more of a physical event. "Reza, I notice you're wearing a new shirt today." / "I notice you've had your hair cut." / I notic you've added more salt than normal to the soup."

Find out = to obtain information. "I need to find out what time the train leaves for Madrid tomorrow." / "I was the last one to find out that my girlfriend was cheating on me."


Joaquin Ruiz Rufo (email)
Hi,
I´m looking for information about the use of these sentences, Could you help me?

Look like, like and Look - What's the difference?

TO LIKE: "I like paella, I like the weather and the people in Valencia."

TO LOOK: "That new T-shirt looks great."

TO LOOK LIKE = to be similar to: "That shirt looks like a shirt I used to have." / "He looks like his brother." (He and his brother have a similar appearance.)

"Reza doesn't like getting up early." (the ACTIVITY of getting up)

"Craig likes to get up early because he can have a slow breakfast, get ready slowly, have a shower." (he likes the RESULT)

TO BE LIKE: "I've never been to Toledo. What's it like?" / "I don't know John's brother. What's he like?" (¿Cómo es?)

"How's John's brother?" (¿Cómo está? - Asking about health)
- He was sick, but he's better now."


Jorge Jimenez - Confusing verbs:
I have a question, What is the difference between to say and to tell (decir)?

You say something and you tell a person

"He said hello." / "He said he wanted to help me." / "He said something in Spanish."

"He told my brother to help him." / "He told the teacher that he had done his homework."

TELL the truth
TELL a lie
TELL a joke
TELL a story

"Tell me to shut up."
"Tell John." - "Say to John."


Prevent/avoid

By avoiding something, you take an action to "go around" the problem. Preventing something means actively interfering to stop something happening.

"I avoided going to the party by saying I was sick."
"I prevented Reza from coming into the room by closing the door."

Listen to/hear

"To hear a noise" / "Hear people speaking."

remember/remind

Remind + direct object: "Remind ME to buy milk."

You remind SOMEONE TO DO something - "Remind me to write the shownotes to this episode."

I've got to leave at 5 p.m. don't forget to remind me. - Tengo que irme a las 5 de la tarde; no te olvides de recordármelo. (make me remember)

Remember

I remember the day you were born. - Me acuerdo del día en que naciste. / Recuerdo el día en que naciste.

Remember is when you think of a memory (a past experience): I remember the first time I met you.
Remind is when a person or thing makes you think about something. Our show notes remind us what we need to talk about.


look/see/Watch

When you look at something you make an effort - "Look at that man over there!"
When you see something you do not make an effort - "I can't see you." / "Did you see John yesterday?"
When you watch something (the TV, a film, a football match) you make an effort to engage in it. - "I'm watching the film" (Watch = to look with attention)


argue/discuss

Argue - discutir (to have a row with someone)
Discuss - hablar (to have a discussion with someone)

fit/suit

Suit - to look good "That shirt really suits you."
Fit - to be the correct size "This shirt doesn't fit me anymore. It's too small."

meet/know (conocer)

"Reza and Craig MET each other in 1998. They have KNOWN each other for many years."

Meet (quedar)
"Shall we meet tomorrow?"
- "Yes, let's meet for a beer."

do/make

Reza and Craig spoke about 'do' and 'make' collocations in Episode 1 and Episode 2

http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/01/30/aprender-ingles-con-reza-y-craig-1/

http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/01/30/aprender-ingles-con-reza-y-craig-2/

Raise/Rise

Rise does not take an object. It's an intransitive verb - "The sun rises."
Raise does take an object so it's a transitive verb - "Raise your hand." / "Ask your boss to raise your salary." / "Ask your boss for a RAISE." (noun)

'Rise' can also be a noun - "The rise of the Roman empire."

Manage/succeed

Succeed IN + gerund - tener exito "John is a lucky guy. He succeeds in everything in life."
Manage + infinitive - conseguir, lograr (You manage something WITH DIFFICULTY) "Although it was very difficult, I managed to pass my First Certificate exam."


win/earn (ganar)

WIN: a competition, a game, the lottery money at a casino, a prize, an award
EARN: a salary, money at work, earn respect

bring/take

Bring it HERE
Take it THERE

lend/borrow

LEND TO: "The bank lends money to you."
BORROW FROM: "You borrow money from the bank."

"Can I borrow your pen?" - ¿Puedo pedirle prestada tu boli?
"Can you lend me your pen?" - ¿Puedes prestarme tu boli?

allow/let/permit

"Let me help you."
"Allow me to help you."
"This contract does not permit you to charge a lot of money."


wear/carry
"What are you wearing?" / Reza's wearing smart clothes."
"When you came in you were carring a briefcase."

wear/dress - to get dressed/put on

"I get up and put on my clothes. After I put on my clothes I'm wearing them."
"I get dressed in the morning."
"Put on your glasses."

lose/miss

"Reza often misses the bus."
"Craig sometimes misses English pubs."

"Reza's losing his mind."
"Craig lost 10 euros."

advise/warn
Advise - aconsejar - "We advise you to listen to this podcast."
warn - avisar - "Reza warned Craig not to drink that eighth whisky." / "He warned me against drinking it."

dismiss/resign

"I resigned from my company." (I handed in my notice)
"I was dismissed from my company." (I was sacked/I was fired)


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to send us a voice message and practise some of the confusing verbs in this episode.

inglespodcast.com - speakpipe

Send us an email, or record your voice and send us a sound file, with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC80_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:36pm CET

Richard and Linda bought a house in Spain and now share their time between the sunny Costa Blanca and their family and friends in the UK.

I spoke to them about their decision to come and live in Spain, what they like about living here and the time Richard drove from the UK to Spain in a sports car!

 
to kick off - to start
solicitor - abogado
council - ayuntamiento
ponderous - pesado/a, agotador/a
lawful - legal
taken aback (surprised, astonished) - dejar atónito
to potter on - move without ?hurrying, in a ?relaxed way, with little energy
take the lead - tomar la iniciativa
easy sailing - easy progress
high-rise developments - edificios de gran altura
to get aroud - moverse
arid - árido/a
firm - empresa, agencia
to engage - contratar
to take a sharp breath - tomar una respiración fuerte
barge in (push in) - colarse
to make up for - compensar
inevitably - inevitablemente
swimming trunks - traje de baño, bañador

1. When Richard lived in the UK, he was

an estate agent
a judge
a solicitor

2. What was the worst thing for Lynda about her job as a committee secretary?

the salary
the people
local politics

3. Who made the decision to move to Spain?

Richard
Linda
Linda's boss

4. What doesn't Richard miss about the UK

English beer
family
the weather

5. What surprised Richard when he first saw Moraira?

how traditional it was
how green it was
how easy it was to drive and park

6. What was an important consideration for Richard and Linda about the area they decided to live in?

There were Spanish lawyers in the area
It had nice beaches
It was close to shops and amenities

7. Why would Linda like to visit the Medieval period of history

to see old buldings
to see how castles used to function
to see how life was in Spain at that time

8. What did Richard do when he was 16?

Bought his brother's sports car
Got arrested on a beach in Spain
Drove through France and Spain with his brother

Find the answers on www.inglespodcast.com/richardandlinda

Direct download: RichardAndLinda_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:40pm CET

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza. 

With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/


In this episode: Cards – What to write in greeting cards – Xmas, birthday, get well soon, retirement, baby, anniversary, retirement, christening etc


Listener Feedback:

Hi Craig, I'm Javier Alberola from Valencia again.

I never imagined I would be capable of doing a review about a podcast such as 'Aprender Inglés.com'.
I have only been studying English for a year, but I know positively (I'm pretty sure) that in my FCE exam may appear this kind of written exercise. (this kind of written exercise may appear in the FCE exam)

'Aprender Inglés con Craig y Reza' has become my favourite podcast for various reasons:
firstly, the majority of the contents are free. (the majority? What do we charge for?)

Secondly, the experience of the protagonists is their most important attribute.
In my opinion, working for the British Council is the best guarantee that this method of education is the appropiate one.

On the other side (On the other hand), I think the success of the podcast is based on the way they transmit information to the audience.
Dialogues are clear, concise and well structured. Tone of voice is another strong point: correct pronunciation is very useful for me and pauses in their speech contribute to a
better comprehension (understanding).

In conclusion, 'Aprender Inglés con Craig y Reza' is the best way of learning English: cheap, top quality and easy to use (especially on a smartphone).
While I do recommend this programme, I warn you that you shouldn't leave a piece of chocolate near Craig... You will never see it again!

Kind regards,
Javier

Greeting Cards

Why do the British, and the Americians, love to send them?

birthday cards
Christmas Cards
aniversary cards
new job cards
promotion cards
retirement cards
Easter Cards
New Baby cards
get well soon cards
death cards (to pass away = to die)


When people die, personal loss - You could write:
I'm sorry for your loss.
My condolences.
Our hearfelt condolences.
With deepest sympathy.
thinking of you at this sad time.
Our prayers/thoughts are with you at this difficult time.
I was sorry/saddened to hear that _________ passed away.


birthday cards - You could write:
happy birthday
Congratulations ON your birthday
Many happy returns
Many, many more wonderful birthdays in the future
Happy 25th (birthday) Live life well!
Roses are red, violets are blue, This poem is old and so are you!
Violets are blue, roses are read, congratulations on not being dead. Happy birthday!

corny = cursi

Christmas Cards - You could write:
Merry Christmas.
Seasons greetings.
Have a great holiday.
Have a wonderful festive season.
Have a great/happy/wonderful New Year!
I wish you a very merry Christmas, and all the best for the coming New Year.
Everything you wish for yourself and your family in the New Year.
Christmas comes but once a year, and when it does it brings good cheer (more beer!)

Anniversary cards - You could write:
Happy anniversary
30 years and still going strong! May there be many more.
Many more happy years together.

Valentine Day cards - You could write:
I love you. You are my dreamboat.
Roses are red, violets are blue, you don't know me, but I love you.
Violets are blue, roses are red, I'd love to get you into bed.

killjoy = aguafiestas

New job cards - You could write:
Good luck in your new job.
Congratulations ON your new position/post/job.
"With great power comes great responsibility" - Spiderman

Promotion cards - You could write:
Congratulations on your retirement

Retirement cards - You could write:
All the best for your retirement.

Easter Cards - You could write:
Happy Easter!

New Baby cards - You could write:
Congratulations on the birth of your baby boy/girl.

get well soon cards - You could write:
Get well soon!
I wish you a speedy recovery.
Get over your illness soon.

Christening (bautismo)
Congratulations on the christening of your baby boy/girl.

A Wedding Invitation:
We would be delighted to enjoy your company at our wedding on ________

RSVP = répondez, s'il vous plaît (please reply)


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to tell us what you think about this greeting card thing. Is it a waste of money? Is it the same to send a virtual greeting card or a Facebook message?

Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. inglespodcast.com - speakpipe

Send us an email, or record your voice and send us a sound file, with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

 


On next week's episode: Confusing verbs (say/tell, hear/listen, watch/see)

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC79_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:16pm CET

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza. 

With over 40 years of teaching between us, Reza and I will help you improve your English and take it to the next level.

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu inglés en http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More Podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


In this episode: Sentence Inversions


Listener Feedback:

AINHOA
Hi Reza and Craig!
I want to thank you for your great job (work). I've listened to different podcasts and yours are the best English learning podcasts ever! They're not only interesting but also fun.
I hear (I listen to) you every morning on my way to work and I enjoy your stories, examples and "sexy voices" (as Reza says...haha).
Thanks again and keep on podcasting.

A voice message from Carolina from Chile

In spite of and despite mean the same and have the same grammar:

We went to the beach in spite of the weather.
We went to the beach despite the weather.

In spite of winning the championship he failed the drug test.
Despite winning the championship he failed the drug test.

In spite of the fact that it was a nice day, we stayed at home.
Despite the fact that it was a nice day, we stayed at home.

Despite the fact that it was raining, we still went to the beach.
In spite of the fact that it was raining, we still went to the beach.

 

Sentence Inversions

Usually, we speak English like this:
“I’ve never seen such a beautiful woman.”

If we want to be more dramatic, we can invert the sentence for greater effect:
“Never have I seen such a beautiful woman.”

Here’s another example:
“As soon as I finished the beer, he bought me another one”

This can be inverted to:
“No sooner had I finished the beer than he bought me another one.”

You could also say:
“Hardly had I finished the beer when he bought me another one.”
“Barely had I finished the beer when he bought me another one.”
“Scarcely had I finished the beer when he bought me another one.”

¡OJO!
No sooner......than......
Barely/Scarcely/Hardly......when

Here’s an inversion with 'not only'
“Pepito not only speaks English, but he also speaks Japanese.”

“Not only does Pepito speak English, but he also speaks Japanese.”

We can invert sentences for emphasis and dramatic effect.
Here’s another example:

“Reza didn’t start shooting until he saw the whites of their eyes.”
For more effect, we can say:
“Not until he saw the whites of their eyes, did Reza start shooting.”

We can also say:

“Only when Reza saw the whites of their eyes, did Reza start shooting.”
Or
“Only after he saw the whites of their eyes, did Reza start shooting.”

"She little suspected that she would be famous one day." - "Little did she suspect that she would be famous one day."

"We have never been more proud of our podcast." - "Never before have we been more proud of our podcast."

"You rarely see such a magnificent performance." - "Rarely do you see such a magnificent performance."

"I hadn’t eaten a better steak anywhere." - "Nowhere had I eaten a better steak."

"You shouldn’t be late on any account." - "On no account should you be late."

"You shouldn't forget your wallet under any circumstances." - "Under no circumstances should you forget your wallet."

"His wife knew little of his serious drinking habit." - "Little did his wife know of his serious drinking habit."

"If I had listened to my teacher, I would have passed the exam." - "Had I listened to my teacher, I would have passed the exam."

First Conditional:
"If you require further information, please do not hesitate to contact us."
"Should you require further information, please do not hesitate to contact us."

Second Conditional:
"If you got the job, would you be prepared to move to the US?"
"Were you to get the job, would you be prepared to move to the US?"

"If you won the lottery, what would you buy?"
"Were you to win the lottery, what would you buy?"

"Were I to offer you some chocolate, would you accept it?"
"If I offered you some chocolate, would you accept it?"

Third conditional:
"If I had known you were an alcoholic, I wouldn't have brought the wine."
"Had I known you were an alcoholic, I wouldn't have brought the wine."

 

Italki are offering a special deal to listeners of Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig – 100 free italki credits (ITCs) when you sign up for their paid service. Buy 1 get 1 free!

Find a teacher and improve your speaking with italki

Reza and I want to thank italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

 

"If I hadn't eaten so much, I wouldn't have suffered diarrhea."
"Had I not eaten so much, I wouldn't have suffered diarrhea."

"If you see my ex-girlfriend, please give her my best wishes." - "Should you see my ex-girlfriend, please give her my best wishes."

"If your boss found out, it would be a disaster. - "Were your boss to find out, it would be a disaster."

"If I had I known she was going to be here, I wouldn't have come." - "Had I known she was going to be here, I wouldn't have come."

"If I had known Mickey were here, I would have invited Craig." - "Had I known Mickey was/were here, I would have invited Craig."

"If you came back as an animal in the next life, which animal would you choose?" - "Were you to come back as an animal in the next life, which animal would you choose?"


Sentences can also be inverted after so and such

“He was so nervous during the interview that he couldn’t speak.”

“So nervous was he during the interview that he couldn’t speak.”

“Such was his nervousness during the interview that he couldn’t speak.”


Transform the following sentences using "so" and "such"

"She was so happy that she couldn’t stop smiling."
With so: "So happy was she that she couldn’t stop smiling."
With such: "Such was her happiness that she couldn’t stop smiling."

So goes with the adjective, SUCH goes with the noun.

"We were so surprised to hear about your wedding that we had to phone immediately to congratulate you."

So surprised were we to hear about your wedding that we had to phone immediately to congratulate you.
Such was our surprise to hear about your wedding that we had to phone immediately to congratulate you.


"Pepito was so depressed that he went to the pub and got drunk."

So depressed was Pepito that he went to the pub and got drunk.
Such was Pepito’s depression that he went to the pub and got drunk.


"I was so ashamed that I couldn’t show my face."

So ashamed was I that I couldn’t show my face.
Such was my shame that I couldn’t show my face.

"I ran so quickly that I nearly had a heart attack." - "So quickly did I run, that I nearly had a heart attack."

"She reads so well that she never makes a mistake. " - "So good is her reading that she never makes a mistake." / "So well does she read that she never makes a mistake."

"This young man will be so successful that I wonder if he will become president." - "So successful will this young man be that I wonder if he will become president."


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to send us a voice message and give some examples of inverted sentences, like "Never have I heard such
a fantastic podcast!" - inglespodcast.com - speakpipe

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


Please show us some iTunes love. Write a review, give us some stars on iTunes.
If you do that, we become more visible and more people can find us. Show us some love.


On next week's episode: Greeting Cards and What to write in them – Christmas cards, birthday cards etc.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu inglés en http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More Podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

 

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC78_Final_Cut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:32pm CET

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza, and we are going to help you grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation. 

With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.

In this episode: Starting a conversation and making small talk

Find more podcast to improve you English at http://www.inglespodcast.com/

Listener Feedback:

Congratulations for the award and for the good work that you do.
My name is Javier, I'm 50 and now I'm unemployed. I used to work as a sports reporter but overnight Canal 9 closed and now I'm looking for living (looking for a career change/looking for a way to earn a living).
All my life, I studied French but this year I started my English course (beginner level).
This summer I went to Belfast to improve my English. In my opinion, the experience was very memorable. The first day I didn't understand anything because in Valencia I learned "standard English".
The second day was completely different. My mind started to think in English. After that, I started to understand the main meaning of the sentences. I had a lot of foreign classmates and I understood all of them.
I think, nowadays, it's essential to have a total immersion in another country to improve. From my point of view, one month in Belfast was more productive than 9 months of classes in Valencia.
It's normally very expensive to go abroad, but thanks to podcasts and free videos on the Internet I can refresh my English everyday.
The only recipe that I know is To practise, to practise and to practise.
Thanks for your attention. Kind regards,
Javier

PS Last October 10th, I had my B1 exam in Valencia. Now I'm waiting for my marks.

Feedback from Alfredo from Italy


Starting a conversation and making small talk

Think of ways to start speaking to someone in English for the first time and keep the conversation going.

Introductions:

Hi / Hello, I'm......

Is this your first time here?

Have you been here before?

What do you think of the conference? / What do you think of the party / speakers / event / music etc?

The Weather:

It's a bit cold today, isn't it?

I'm sweating, it's boiling!

Oh, what a terrible wind!

Oh, I hope it doesn't rain.

It's freezing / boiling today!

Nice day, isn't it? 7 Lovely weather, isn't it? (with falling intonation)

Study more tag questions in episode 20 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/04/14/reza-doesnt-like-raw-eggs-does-he-airc20/ )

Study indirect questions in episode 50 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/05/11/indirect-questions-and-travel-in-morocco-with-special-guest-nicola-airc50/ )

More Small talk questions:

Have you been here before?

Do I know you from somewhere? Haven't I seen you here before? You look familiar. (these questions could be interpreted as 'chat-up lines' - para ligar)

Can I help you? Do you need help?

What's the score? Who's winning?

Did you see the match last night?

Where are you from? Which part of the UK are you from?

How long have you been here?

Do you mind me asking why you're here?

Are you waiting for someone? Can I buy you a drink?

Have you got a light?


Ending a conversation:

Please excuse me, I need to go to the toilet / I've just seen somebody I know.

It's been lovely to meet you but I'm sorry I have to go.

It's really nice talking to you. I hope to see you again.

I'm afraid I've arranged to meet someone, so I must go now.

I really enjoyed speaking with you.

 Send us an email, or record your voice and send us a sound file, with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Find more podcast to improve you English at http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


On next week's episode: Greeting cards. What is it with British people and greeting cards?

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC77_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CET

Strong adjectives - AIRC76

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome! We are going to help you grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.


In this episode: Strong adjectives: big - huge, enormous / angry - furious etc.

Hay más podcasts para mejor tu inglés aquí: http://www.inglespodcast.com/


Listener Feedback:

Hello Craig, I'm Rafael (again), I have heard (I heard) in your last episode, that one listener ask for the Spanish expression "tira y afloja" this expressión is very common in Spanish,
and there is always a negotiation on (there's always debate about it)....I'll explain you in a example. When Russia and USA, se reunen para negociar algo,
Russia cede en algo a favor de los Estados Unidos y Estados Unidos cede en otra cosa a favor de Rusia, cuando esa negociación es dura, entonces hablamos de un "tira y afloja"
(uno cede en algo a favor del otro y el otro cede en algo en favor de uno)....don't confuse with the expression (very similar) "rifirrafe" is the same but more hard (heavy)
example: two players in a macht of football, se están dando "leña" (not fair play, but the contrary), se dan "pataditas"durante todo el encuentro o se llegan a insultar (por ejemplo)
entonces decimos que ha habido un "rifirrafe" entre dos jugadores....

rifirrafe = altercation, rough stuff, squabble. argy bargy

a needle match (needle = aguja)

I looked for the phrasal verb "trade off" and it is not the same, in Spanish it would be "compensación" as you have well explained in the episode.
Another thing, tell Reza that 'el día de la Hispanidad'... He made a good translation as Spanishness (I looked in the dictionary) and also Colombus day (as you have well said in the episode)

Bueno esto es todo, espero no haberme puesto muy pesado, (y si me pongo), no tienes mas que decirmelo. (que dejaré de serlo)
Thanks a lot
Rafael Alba Garcia

Our English courses are free at mansioningles.com

You can get private lessons with a personal teacher at italki.com


Strong (extreme) adjectives

Angry - furious
Big - huge, enormous, vast, titanic, colossal
Clever - brilliant, ingenious
Cold - freezing
Dirty - filthy, stinking, grotty (cutre)
Hot - boiling, roasting, baking hot
Hungry - starving, famished
Interested - fascinated
Pleased - ecstatic, thrilled, delighted
Shocked - horrified
Scared - frightened-petrified/terrified
Small - tiny, miniscule
Surprised - amazed, astonished, shocked
Tired - exhausted (knackered - British English colloquial slang)
Ugly - hideous
Upset - devastated


PROVERBS - What is a proverb? - A simple and concrete saying, popularly known and repeated, that expresses a truth based on common sense or the practical experience of humanity.
A proverbs are often metaphorical (metaphor - metáfora).


"You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink"

"Don't count your chickens before they hatch."

"The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence."

"You can't judge a book by its cover."

"Absence makes the heart grow fonder."

"Out of sight, out of mind."


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Send us a voice message with your favourite proverb or saying to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.co, or send us a voice message using speakpipe

Join us on Blab and practise your speaking for free:

On next week's episode: Starting a conversation and making small talk.

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Hay más podcasts para mejor tu inglés aquí: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC76_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:01am CET

Mansion interviews Ryan Sink from businessenglishqanda.com

http://www.businessenglishqanda.com/


Hello and welcome to Mansion Interviews, a podcast which gives me an excuse to talk to interesting people while at the same time improving your English.

When I was in Manchester this year for the New Media Europe conference I was lucky enough to meet a great guy called Ryan Sink.

Ryan's so nice to be around. He's the kind of person who makes you feel comfortable and relaxed as soon as you meet him. It's just as shame that we didn't have a lot of time to talk more at the conference and also that we happen to live in different countries.

So I jumped on Skype with Ryan after the conference and that's what you're going to hear now. A Mansion Interview with Ryan Sink from businessenglishQ&A.com http://www.businessenglishqanda.com/


You can improve your listening with comprehension questions and find some help with difficult words from this interview at inglespodcast.com/ryan

 

 

Vocabulary

to kick start - hacer arrancar

to figure out - llegar a entender

groceries - provisiones, comida

tap (UK) / faucet (US) - grifo

a dirty look - una mirada de odio

to get around - evitar

to end up - acabar en, terminar en

to set up - instalar, establecerse en un negocio

smart - inteligente

stubborn - terco/a,  tozudo

mussels - mejillones

shrimp - gambas

squid - calamares

dish - plato

roll - panecillo, bocadillo

bank holiday - festivo nacional

influx - influjo

to polish - pulir, perfeccionar

coaching - entrenamiento, preparación

the nitty-gritty (the practical details) - meollo del asunto

resourses - recursos

scholarship - beca

 


Ryan, thanks man for spending the time. You can check out Ryan's wonderful website and his podcast at: businessenglishQ&A.com.

All links, as usual, can be found in the shownotes at inglespodcast.com/ryan

For a free 15 minute consultation, email Ryan at ryanlsink@gmail.com


Thank you to you for listening to this Mansion Interview. You can find more podcasts to improve your English at inglespodcast.com and you can study English free at mansioningles.com

If you enjoyed this podcast, please go to iTunes and give us some iTunes love, a few of those lovely stars and maybe a short review so that more people can find our podcasts.

 

Direct download: Ryan_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:49am CET