Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free
Lecciones para aprender y mejorar tú inglés. English lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and listening skills.

If you are a new listener to this award-winning podcast, welcome!
With over 40 years of teaching between us, Reza and Craig will help you improve your English and take it to the next level.
Grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation.

Reza is 'blowing his own trumpet'!


In this episode: The Past Continuous

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


Listener Feedback: Javier from Burgos

This is Javier from Burgos. I am a lecturer of environmental chemistry at the University of Burgos.
I would like to congratulate you on your podcasts. I have found them very useful to improve my listening skills.
I am quite used to reading and writing in English due to my job (mostly scientific papers writen in an academic and formal style)
but my oral and listening skills are not at the same level.

The other day, my eldest son got the "Play Station" as a Christmas present.
He was playing a game where the characters were speaking in American English.
They talked so fast and probably used a lot of slang that I could hardly understand a thing. It was so frustrating!
I know that your podcasts have an educational purpose and you make an effort to speak clearly and more or less slowly.
I understand you reasonably well when you speak but the event regarding my son's game left me shattered (destrozado, destruido).

Well, I guess that it is all a matter of time (spending time listening and listening) and never giving up.

Finally, I would like to tell you that your podcasts are a good fun and you are funny too.
I have seen your photos on your podcast webpage and you "have a face of good people"
(I am afraid that I have not translated properly the Spanish sentence: "tenéis cara de buenas personas" - you look/seem nice).
But, who is Reza and who is Craig in the picture?. Who is the one wearing glasses and who is the one holding a cup (of tea, I guess)?
(Reza's the one wearing glasses and Craig is drinking tea)

If only one of you were eating biscuits, I would know who it is, ja, ja. Sorry for the joke!

Kind regards from Burgos,

Listen to a wide variety of English accents to improve your listening (BBC, CNN, VOA, TV series, FIlms in original version, video games, songs in English, our podcasts! and TED talks: https://www.ted.com/talks


When do we use the past continuous?

At the beginning of a story:
This morning, when I went out to get some milk, the sun was shining, the birds we singing, people were driving to work and walking to school...


To talk about something which happened at a particular moment in the past, often starting before that moment and continuing after it.

Example: What were you doing at 10 o'clock this morning?
At 10 o'clock this morning Craig was working on his computer.
Reza was having a shower.

I was making tea when Reza rang the bell. (compare with:”Reza rang the bell, he came in, I made tea, I took out the biscuits.”)

Use the present continuous when two actions are happening parallel to one onother in the past:

As I was making tea, Reza was telling me about his weekend.

While Reza was preparing the dinner, his girlfriend was watching TV.

I was dreaming about this beautiful girl when suddenly my alarm clock rang.

What were you doing at 9 o’clock last night?
Where were you at 11 am yesterday morning?


¡OJO! Not all long actions in the past are expressed with the past continuous tense. ("Reza lived in Salamanca for two years." - Past simple)


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inglespodcast.com/italki/ - click on ‘start speaking – find a teacher’
We want to say thank you to italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

 

We also use the past continuous:

for something that was happening again and again:

I was practising Spanish every day for at least an hour.
He was having an affair with his secretary.
They were always eating in expensive restaurants.

with verbs which show change or growth:

My two daughters were growing up quickly.
My Spanish was improving.
My hair was going grey.

How do you form the past continuous? - Use the past of the verb TO BE (was/were) + ing - Examples: “I was editing a podcast when my mum rang.” / “Reza and I were having a beer when we saw a student walk past.”

The question form: "What were you doing yeasterday at 11am?"

The negative form: "I was NOT watching TV this morning." - "We were not drinking beer." - Contractions: "I wasn't watching TV, I was working on my computer." - "We weren't drinking beer, we were having a conversation."

"I was wondering if you'd like to come out to dinner tonight."

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to give us some personal examples of past continuous and present perfect continuous. Answer the question: "What were you doing when you were listening to this podcast?"

Send us a voice message. speakpipe.com/inglespodcast (90 seconds - need an app for mobile)

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

On next week's episode: Politics and Government

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Direct download: AIRC88_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:12pm CET

If you are a new listener to this award-winning podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. I’m Reza.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.
(Grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation)

In this episode: Academic English

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

Thank you to JUAN LEYVA GALERA who has become a Patron of this show. If you would like to support us and help us to our goal of $100 per month to give you transcriptions
of Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig, go to patreon.com/inglespodcast

Elisa from Finland sent us a message for the Christmas episode inglespodcast/82. ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/12/20/reza-and-craigs-christmas-special-airc82/ )

She said "you guys sang surprisingly well" - She also gave some inside information on Santa's sleigh and recommends people visit the website santapark.com. Elisa said, "Santa Claus lives here in the Santa Park with Mrs Claus and Elves!"
(I thought it was "Elvis"!)

We also have a voice message from our good friend Mamen from Biescas. She listened to episode 81 about British and American English pronunciation differences : inglespodcast.com/81

( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/12/13/british-and-american-english-pronunciation-differences-airc81/ ).

Here is Mamen practising the different pronunciation of US and UK English……

There are reasons why Mamen is improving her English:
-She’s engaging with the language.
-She’s taking the time to practise speaking, record her voice, coming on Blab. (inglespodcast.com/blab)
-She’s enthusiastic about learning.

Listener Feedback: Jesús Vélez
Hi Craig and Reza! Thanks for your podcast, I think it's fantastic. It's a huge help for "travelers" (commuters): my journey from my home to job (work) is about 120 km (1 hour...).
I use your podcast to take my English to the next level. Currently, I'm preparing my C1. Would you mind to speak (speaking) about academic English?
For example keywords I must use in the university with some colleagues, research concepts (paper, article, stay, fellowship...)
I think there's a lot of material on the internet, but it's a disaster... There's no order at all.

Thanks in advance (excuse me for my poor English) and continue with the programs!
Kind regards, Jesús Vélez

 

ACADEMIC ENGLISH

Academic English style is generally evident in a:
Journal (like a technical/academic magazine); Text book; Essay; Academic article; Report; Dissertation; Thesis; etc. WRITTEN
Lecture; Talk; Workshop; Presentation; Tutorial; Seminar; Conference; etc. SPOKEN


Different style of language compared to General English. Key features include:

More abstract, more impersonal, more structured, more organised, usually formal (written), often more technical, often more complex, avoids ambiguity, may include references to other sources.

-Avoid personal pronouns, eg. I, me, you, us, etc.

-Use the Passive (to be impersonal):
eg. the liquid was heated to 20 degrees C; it can be seen that the species evolved.

-Avoid contractions in written academic Eng., but usually OK spoken:
eg. It will not be resolved (not “won’t”); the conclusions are not definitive (not “aren’t”)


-Nominalisation = using nouns rather than verbs. This sounds more academic:
eg. “...the Norman invasion of Britain in 1066, provoking a huge linguistic change.” is better than “...when the Normans invaded Britain in 1066 and it provoked a huge change.”

-Use plenty of linking words or signpost your discourse:

eg. Firstly; Secondly; Next; A further point; Finally; Lastly - LISTING

Moreover; In addition (to); Additionally; Furthermore; What is more - ADDING INFO.

However; Nevertheless; Nonetheless; Despite; In spite of; Whereas; Whilst; Although; Albeit; Notwithstanding; Be that as it may; On the other hand - CONTRAST/CONCESSION

For example/instance; As an/one example; As exemplified by___; To illustrate - EXAMPLE

According to Smith (1987); As Smith (1987) said; Smith (1987) wrote/stated - REFERENCE

In conclusion; To conclude; To sum up; In brief; All in all; In short - CONCLUSION

 

Italki ad - Reza’s experience with a French teacher, Justine.

 

Common university campus terms:

There are usually several departments in one faculty eg. the Department of Physics in the Science Faculty

bachelor’s degree; master’s degree - comes after or is longer than a bachelor’s degree

eg. She has a BA (Bachelor of Arts) in History; He’s doing an MSc in Mathematics (Master of Science) at Oxford.

a doctorate or PhD - the highest post-graduate uni. qualification, requiring a few years of study, research and a doctoral thesis

an undergraduate - a student studying on a bachelor’s (first) degree course

a graduate - a person who has completed a bachelor’s degree course

a post-graduate - a person who is studying on a higher course after passing their first degree

a fellow - someone who (temporarily) teaches/researches (and perhaps still studies on a post-graduate course) at a university, but not a full lecturer

a fellowship - the job given to a fellow

a lecturer - a person who gives lectures at a university

a professor - an experienced, distinguished, more senior lecturer (NOT the same as teacher)

a grant - money given by the govt. to help support students throughout the year, depending on their financial situation

a scholarship - money given by a university/college/school/company to a student because they won it or are poor but talented.

halls of residence - official university accommodation on campus, usually a large block

vice-chancellor (VC)- the top person in charge of a university (the dean in a North American college)

pro-vice-chancellor (PVC)/deputy-vice-chancellor (DVC) - second in command, under the vice-chancellor

higher education (HE) - tertiary-level education, ie. higher than primary and secondary education

eg. university, college, medical school, etc.


For the most common vocabulary used to study at HE level, the Academic Word List:
http://ksngo.org/images/download/LDOCE_AWL.pdf

Reza has taught Academic English at Queen’s University, Belfast and the University of Ulster. Here are a few well known books he has used:
http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Academic-English-Edition-Longman/dp/0131523597

http://www.amazon.com/Presenting-English-Successful-Presentations-Updated/dp/1111832277

http://www.cambridge.org/us/cambridgeenglish/catalog/english-academic-purposes/academic-vocabulary-use/academic-vocabulary-use-answers
An example unit from the book:
http://assets.cambridge.org/97805216/89397/excerpt/9780521689397_excerpt.pdf

A great place to listen to talks and lectures on just about any (academic) topic:
https://www.ted.com/talks

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to tell us if you have had experience of academic English. Have you been to university? Do you have a degree? Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. speakpipe.com/inglespodcast (90 seconds - need an app for mobile)

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.
Please show us some iTunes love. Write a review, give us some stars on iTunes.
If you do that, we become more visible and more people can find us. Show us some love.

On next week's episode: The Past Continuous

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'


Please show us some iTunes love. Write a review, give us some stars on iTunes.
If you do that, we become more visible and more people can find us. Show us some love.

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

 

On next week's episode:

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC87_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CET

Hello and welcome to Mansion Interviews, a podcast which gives me an excuse to talk to interesting people while at the same time improving your English.

Today I'm speaking to a good friend of mine, Danny. I've known Danny for many years and he happens to be North American which is good news for you because many listeners have been asking me about the differences between American and British English. So Danny jumped on Skype and we compared vocabulary differences between US and UK English. Acually, I tested him to see how much British English vocabulary he knows. So what do you think? Did he pass the test? More importantly, do you know these vocabulary differences? Let's see. There are no comprehension questions becuase this isn't an interview listening practice,

but you will find a complete list of the vocabulary we talk about at http://www.inglespodcast.com/danny/  

 

Where do you live and where is your accent from?

Danny has a mid-western accent from Detroit, Michegan. He now lives in Ann Arbor, Michegan.

Test your British-American English vocabulary. Do you know the American word for the following common British English vocabulary?

We'll start off easy to warm you up. I say the British English word, you say the American English word

lift - elevator (asensor)
flat - apartment (piso, apartamento)
holiday - vacation (vacaciones)
autumn - fall (otoño)
a queue / to queue up - a line / to stand in line (cola / hacer cola) - to stand/wait 'on line' on the East Coast of the USA.
bill - check (cuenta)
quid - buck (50 quid - 50 bucks / a 50-pound note - a 50 dollar bill - billete)
shopping centre - shopping mall (centro comercial)


CLOTHES
trainers - gym shoes/sneakers (zapatillas de deporte)
tights - panty hose (medias)
knickers - panties (bragas)
vest - undershirt/T-shirt (chaleco)

ALCOHOL
barman / barmaid - bartender (barman)
stag night / hen night - bachelor/bachelorette party (despedida de soltero/a)
pub crawl - bar hop (ir de chateo, ir de copas, recorrido por bares)
beer mat - coaster (posavasos)

BABIES
nappy - diaper (pañales)
dummy - pacifier (chupete)
pram - baby buggy / baby carriage (cochecito de niño)

FOOD
crisps - (potato) chips (papas)
take-away (food) - carry-out (food) (comida para llevar)

IN THE HOUSE
cooker - range, stove (cocina (los fuegos)
tap - faucet (grifo)
rubbish bin / dustbin - garbage can / trash can (cubo / contenedor de basura)
estate agent - real estate agent / realtor (inmobilario/a)
post code - zip code (codigo postal)
torch - flashlight (linterna)

IN THE STREET
pavement - sidewalk (acera)
zebra crossing - pedestrian crossing / pedestrian crosswalk (paso de cebra)
roundabout - roundabout / traffic circle (rotonda)
car park - parking lot (parking)
petrol station - gas station (gasolinera)
motorway - highway, freeway, expressway (autopista)
flyover - overpass (paso elevado)
busker - street performer (músico callejero)
skip - dumpster (contenedor)
lorry - truck (camión)
cash point (machine) - ATM (cajero automático)

WORK
CV - resumé (curriculum)
to sack - to fire (despedir)
redundancy - layoff (desempleo / to make (s.o.) redundant - to lay (s.o.) off
public limited company (plc) - LLC / incorporated company (inc.) (sociedad anónima (s.a.)

Feeling confident? Now they get harder!

anorak - raincoat / windbreaker (anorak)
rubber - condom or eraser (goma)
wellies (wellingtons) - rubber boots (botas de goma)
wally - jerk, idiot (tonto)
off licence - liquor store (bodega)
fish slice - spatula (paleta)

SLANG
brolly - umbrella (paraguas)
loo, bog - john (lavabo, water)
toilet - restroom
knackered - tired, whipped, exhausted (agotado)
mate - friend, buddy, pal (amigo)


Many thanks to to my good friend, my old mate, my long-time pal, buddy and all round good guy Danny from Detroit, Michegan. Thanks, man!

And thank you for listening. If you have any comments or questions, or if you just want to say 'hi' you can send an email to craig@inglespodcast.com or send me a voice

message at speakpipe.com/inglespodcast .

There's a detailed list of American and British English Vocabulary with Spànish translations at mansioningles.com and there is a link to this on the website at inglespodcast.com/danny

http://www.mansioningles.com/vocabulario63.htm 

Direct download: Danny_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:48pm CET

If you are a new listener, welcome! 


With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.
Grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/


In this episode: Pronunciation | Silent Letters

Feedback: Thanks to all of you who have left us reviews and stars on iTunes. It's a huge help for us because we become more visible and more people find us.
If you want to show us some iTunes love I'll put a link in the shownotes (inglespodcast/86 or just put ingles in the search box and you will see us (La Mansión del Inglés)


We practised the pronunciation of some words that have silent letters in episode 38
( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/12/21/must-ought-to-and-should-vocabulary-in-the-home-the-kitchen-and-pronunciation-of-difficult-words-airc38/ )

Today we're going to give you a longer list and focus on groups of words that have the same silent letter.

Silent letters (I say the Spanish word, you say the English word before you hear it)

/t/
listen - escuchar
soften - ablandarse, suaveizarse
whistle - silbar (chiflar in Mexico)
fasten - atar, abrochar
Christmas - Navidad
castle - castillo


/k/
knife - cuchillo
knee - rodilla
knowledge - knowledge
knit - tejer, hacer punto
knob - pomo, picaporte (a knob of butter)
know - conocer, saber
knot - nudo


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Reza and I want to thank italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

 

/p/
receipt - recibo
pseudonym - seudónimo
psychic - psíquico/a
psychology - psicología
psychiatry - psiquiatría
pneumatic - neumático


/b/
climb - subir, ascender, escalar
debt - deuda
subtle - sutil
comb - peinilla, peine, peineta
numb - entumecido/a, adormecido, insensible
dumb - tonto/a, estúpido/a
doubt - dudar, duda
womb - útero
lamb - cordero
tomb - tumba, sepulcro


/h/
hour - hora
hourly - una vez por hora
honest - honesto/a
heir / heiress - heredero / heredera
honour - honor
honourable - honorable (dishonourable)

/e/
site
language
ride
note
care
curve

/t/
gourmet
debut

/ed/
stopped
kissed
helped
travelled


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. If you have a comment or question, please record a voice message and send it to us. www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

We'll be happy to speak about your message and answer your questions in future episodes.

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

On next week's episode: Academic English

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC86_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:04pm CET

If you are a new listener to this, welcome! I'm Craig. This is Reza.
With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English (vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation) and take it to the next level.

 


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

In this episode: News and current affairs Vocabulary

The News (news is an uncountable noun - some news, a piece of news, I have good/bad news)

a newspaper (a paper): National/local paper, Daily paper
What's the difference between a tabloid and a broadsheet?
the gutter press - gutter = alcantarilla, canaleta - newspapers that focus on sensational journalism, usually about the lives of famous people.
phone tapping - pinchazo telefónico
reporter - periodista
headlines - titular, cabecera
foreign correspondent - corresponsal extranjero, corresponsal en el extranjero
anchorman - presentador
foreign, international news / home, national news
editor / editorial
to write a column / to write a piece (blog post)
researcher - investigador, investigadora
journalism - journalist, photo-journalist
articles - artículo
supplements
circulation (readership) - tirada
proof reader - a person who checks for errors
fact checker - a person who makes sure the facts are correct
deadline - fecha límite, fecha tope
to bury the lead -
to cover a story - to report on an event or development
in-depth coverage of something - a thorough analysis of something
to verify - to check that something is correct
eyewitness reports - descriptions of what happened by people who actually saw an event take place
breaking news - news which is just coming in - noticia de última hora
link-bait (wordreference.com: Enlace de Internet "cebo", "anzuelo", destinado a atraer la atención del internauta)
hot off the press - very recent news. It's just happened or it's happening now!

· newsagent (UK) = vendedor/a de periódicos / newsagent's, news-stand = quiosco de prensa
· newsreader (UK) / newscaster (USA) = presentador de noticias
· news item = noticia
· news report / newscast (USA) = programa informativo
newsflash

Recommended resources:

Vocabulary from Lessons 17 and 18 of the Mansion Ingles Intermediate course:
( http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer17_1.htm )
( http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer18_6.htm )

YouTube: bbclearningenglish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOz6GCqXtt0 (striving, offset, revolutionary advances, ambassadors)
The vocabulary seems difficult at first, but Words repeat frequently in news stories.

VOA Learning English: ( https://www.youtube.com/user/VOALearningEnglish )

Listen to the BBC news: ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldserviceradio ) The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service. (On iPlayer)
How many separate news stories do you hear? What are they about? COuntry? City? Problem? Names of people?

The news is a good subject for small talk:

Isn't it terrible what's happening in Syria?
Have you heard how bad the weather is in the UK?
What about Valencia last week? Did you see the game?
Who do you think will win the election?


Where do you tend to get your news from? Blogs? Twitter? TV? Radio? Newspapers? Other people? Mobile phone apps? (BBC, Reuters)
Do you read magazines? Time? Newsweek? The Economist?

What's your opinion on citizen journalism?
citizen journalism - a new expression describing the kind of journalism based on images,
audio and reports sent in to news groups by ordinary members of the public who witnessed events.


Italki are offering a special deal to listeners of Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig – 100 free italki credits (ITCs) when you sign up for their paid service. Buy 1 get 1 free!

Find a teacher and improve your speaking with italki

Reza and I want to thank italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

 

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. How do you get your news? Have you heard any good news lately?
We want you to tell us......Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. www.speakpipe/inglespodcast

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

On next week's episode: Pronunciation | Silent Letters

 


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC85_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:00pm CET

Getting Married and Wedding vocabulary - AIRC84

If you are a new listener to this podcast, welcome!
With over 40 years of teaching between us, Reza and Craig will help you improve your English and take it to the next level.

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

In this episode: Weddings, getting married and what to say on the Big Day!


Listener Feedback: Rafel
A very interesting episode, but here in Spain we have lost the custom of sending letters or cards. I dont remenber if I've ever sent or received one.
I only find letters from the bank in the letter box with a receipt (bank statement) inside.
But nowadays with the internet people congratulate one another much more with applications such as WHAT'S APP.

(Episode 79 - What to write in greeting cards ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/11/29/what-to-write-in-greeting-cards-airc79/ )
Rafel, there were some mistakes in your email which I have corrected and you can see the correct version in the shownotes at inglespodcast.com/84

Weddings - The Big Day!

to get married TO someone / to marry someone / to get divorced FROM someone
a priest marries you
to be engaged, an engagement party/ring (fiancée - the woman / financé - the man), to pop the question, to get down on one knee (to propose), to make wedding vows (vow = strong promise - juramento)
church / registry offoce (Registro Civil)

People:

priest/minister/justice of the peace: person who legally marries the couple
bride: woman getting married (novia)
groom: man getting married (novio)
best man: groom’s best friend or closest family member (witness to the marriage and person responsible for the ring and stag night (UK) bachelor party (US) (despedida de soltero) - despedida de soltera = hen night
maid of honour: bride’s best friend or closest family member (witness to the marriage)
bridesmaids: other female friends or family members who accompaby the bride
guests /gests)
caterers / barstaff
Newlywed(s) - People who have just married are referred to as "newlyweds."

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Other vocabulary:

reception
to make a speech (not very common at Spanish weddings)
tuxedo - esmoquin
a wedding dress with a veil
honeymoon
carry/throw a bouquet (of flowers)
to walk down the aisle
to get cold feet


How to make small talk at a wedding:

Where should I sit?
How do you know the bride and groom?
Have you tried the caviar? It's delicious!
Which one is the best man?
Would you like some more wine?
Can I get you another glass of champagne?
Pay a compliment: I like your dress, shirt, jacket, necklace. Where did you get it?
Would you mind taking a photo?
What do you think of the music?
I thought the soup was very interesting/different/unusual.
Do you like DANCING? / Would you like TO DANCE?


What to say to the bride and/or groom after the wedding:

Congratulations!
You look stunning. (very beautiful)
You look handsome. (very good looking; say to males)
Your dress is gorgeous/amazing/brathtaking (it takes my breath away).
The food was delicious.
Thank you for inviting us.
We really enjoyed ourselves. / We had a wonderful time.
The wedding was beautiful.
When’s the honeymoon? / Where are you going? (Not XWhere will you goX)


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to tell us about the last wedding you went to. Who got married? What was it like? Did you enjoy it?
If you are already married, what was your wedding like? What do you remember? If you're planning a wedding, what would be your dream wedding? What's your opinion of wedding? Are they
a waste of money, or the best day of your life?

......Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. www.speakpipe/inglespodcast (maximum of 90 seconds)

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com  or belfastreza@gmail.com.

 

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


On next week's episode: Listening to The News - News and currect affairs vocabulary

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC84_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:00pm CET