Aprender ingles with Reza and Craig
English lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and listening skills. We'll help you take your English to the next level! Lecciones para aprender y mejorar tú inglés.

In this episode we're going to help you bust some cultural myths about the UK and British people

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Comment on the website from Fleudy:
Good afternoon,I have a problem with my English.
I’ve been learning English for two years and I know a lot of words and grammar, but my big problem is the listening.
This problem have (has) been hitting(bugging) me for a long time. Please tell me what I can do to improve it.

Listen to podcasts. Search Google for your hobbies and interests and then type the word 'podcast' (for example, 'football podcast', 'movie podcast', 'tech podcast')
Also search on itunes, Google Play, ivoox, and use podcast apps like Stitcher.

http://www.apple.com/lae/itunes/ 
https://play.google.com/store?hl=en 
https://www.stitcher.com/ 

Also listen to English music and films in origianl version (and this podcast!)


Listener Feedback from Ando from Mexico
Great pronunciation! Mexicans eat a lot of tacos. The Spanish dance Flamenco, go to bullfights and are lazy because they always have a siesta and leave everything until mañana!

What about the UK?


Let’s bust some cultural myths!

1. Everyone in England speaks with either a London Cockney accent or posh like the Queen.

2. We're always drinking tea. India, Turkey, China and Ireland drink more (per head of population).
Brits drink almost as much coffee as tea. "Come round for tea" = come to our house for the evening meal.

3. We all know Sean Connery, Mick Jagger, David Beckham and The Queen personally.

4. Everyone lives in London or in houses like Downtown Abbey.

5. The food is terrible! Britain has four restaurants that have a 3 michelin stars and has the 4th, 5th and 9th best restaurant in the world, according to Trip Advisor (http://uk.businessinsider.com/tripadvisors-best-restaurants-in-the-world-2015-2015-10?r=US&IR=T) Gordon Ramsey, Jamie Oliver, Heston Blumenthal

6. It's always raining (Britain is number 46th in a list of worldwide average rainfall,
this is above countries such as New Zealand (29th) and even the USA (25th)).
It drizzles a lot in the UK.
Brits speak about the weather a lot and it's also common to see rain and bad weather in British art. Winters are longer than summer in the UK.
Do the British always carry umbrellas?

7. All Brits have bad teeth - a study by the OECD, published in The Economist, shows that Brits have some of the healthiest teeth in the world. ( http://www.economist.com/node/15060097 )

8. British people hate Europeans and North Americans.

9. The British are very reserved and unfriendly.

10 We drink warm beer.

11. The English sometimes confuse “British” with “English”, as do non-British people
(see inglespodcast.com/52) ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/05/24/phrasal-verbs-with-up-england-britain-great-britain-and-the-uk-gerunds-and-infinitives-asking-for-directions-airc52/ )

It can be difficult to tell the difference between the accents of Canadians and North Americans and between Australians and New Zealanders


How would you stereotype the Chinese? The Germans? The Brazilians? The French? (which adjectives would you use?)

How much do you think I live up to an English stereotype?

Say some adjectives and I’ll tell you which nationality you’re stereotyping.


HEAVEN
“Heaven is where the police are British, the cooks are French, the mechanics are German, the lovers are Italian, and it’s all organised by the Swiss”

HELL
“Hell is where the police are German, the cooks are English, the mechanics are French, the lovers are Swiss, and it’s all organised by the Italians.”

Thoughts on Cuisine:
“The Europeans have good food. The British have...good table manners!”


Quotes from George Mikes - a Hungarian writer who came to the UK for a few weeks, but ended up staying, obtaining British nationality and writing about the British -
“The British are brave people. They can face anything, except reality.”

“An Englishman, even if he is alone, forms an orderly queue of one.”

“The British - as the whole world, particularly the British, keep saying - are the most fair-minded people in the world.
After the Second World War they declared: ‘Let’s be fair. We’ve been Top Nation for centuries. We have done splendidly well once again. Now we must give others a chance. Let’s decline’.”


Audio message from Santiago from Argentina: Reverse culture shock


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 


Nuestra tienda de descargas: http://store.mansioningles.net/


Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 


Our lovely sponsors are:
Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Giving Advice and Using recommend and suggest in English


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Direct download: AIRC135_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

How are you feeling? How do you feel? Are you in the mood to practise English with us?
We’re looking at feelings vocabulary today in Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Hello Craig, this is Alberto, again. (Luis Alberto Diaz Garcia - email)
¨Please help me with a doubt. When (do) I have to use "to me" or "for me".
For example when people are talking about some topic and you have to give your opinion. Is it "to me" or "for me"?
Another example when you are in a restaurant and your girlfriend asks for fish and you ask for your meal after her (immediately). Is it "for me only salad" or "to me only salad"?
I will appreciate your help. Keep doing your excellent podcast!!
Bye guys

In this episode we're going to help you talk about your feelings.
Listener Feedback: Audio feedback from Mamen

commute is a verb. I commute to work every day.
Noun: I listened to Aprender Inglés with Reza during my commute.
I am a commuter. I commute to work every day. I have a 20-minute commute.

Feelings
I feel sad, lonely, afraid, blue, depressed, down, stressed
I feel happy, positive, wonderful, enthusiastic, energetic, confident, healthy

Voice message from Ana from Mexico: How does Ana feel and why?
(Ana from Mexico feels disappointed, upset. She doesn't feel well - because of her level of English)
I wrote to Ana and asked her for to tell us a bit more about her profession and which jobs has she applied for. She answered by email:
“I'm a manufacturing engineer and I have applied for these kind of jobs, such as a project engineer, process engineer and others jobs related to manufacturing.
I think I have not been accepted because the level of English they need is advanced, it is because global companies work with people around the world. It is required to talk about specifications of machines, materials, measures, tolerances, and more,especially over negotiations in money.”


I think her English is very, very good.
Suggestions: italki / Monica Stocker's FITA course.

Episode 43 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/02/21/how-to-have-a-job-interview-in-english-and-work-vocabulary-airc43/  )
Episode 58 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/07/05/job-interview-questions-airc58/  )

My job interview ebook and audio.

Are the following positive or negative feelings?

Anxious - ansioso/a
Ashamed - avergonzado/a - "Craig is ashamed of his level of Spanish."
Astonished (amazed, surprised) - asombrado - "We are astonished at the number of listeners we have."
Awful (horrible, terrible) - espantoso/a
Bored (uninterested) - aburrido/a
Concerned (worried) - preocupado/a
Confused - confundido
Contented (satisfied) - contento/a, satisfecho/a
Disappointed - decepcionado, desilusionado
Ecstatic (very, very happy, joyful) - extático/a
Embarrassed (self-conscious) - avergonzado/a
Excited - entusiasmado/a
Furious (very, very angry) - furioso/a
Guilty - culpable
Hopeful (optimistic) - optimista
Inadequate (insufficient) - deficiente, inapropiado/a, inadecuado/a
Inferior - inferior
Insecure - inseguro/a
Irritated - irritado, enojado/a
Jealous - celoso/a / envious - envidioso/a What's the difference between jealousy (celos) and envy (envidia)?
Envy is when you want what someone else has, but jealousy is when you're worried someone's trying to take what you have.
Envy is a reaction to lacking something.
Jealousy is a reaction to the threat of losing something (usually someone).
“I’m envious of my friends town house and office space.” Are you a jealous person?
Mad / angry - enfadado / crazy about (in a positive way) "I'm mad about podcasting."
Peaceful - tranquilo/a
Proud - orgulloso/a
Scared (afraid) - aterrorizado, asustado
Sensitive - sensible
Suspicious - sospechoso "That man looks suspicious." / "I feel suspicious of my neighbour."
Threatened (in danger) - amenazado
Vulnerable - vulnerable
Worthless - despreciable / (cosa) sin valor - "This old painting is worthless."

How did you feel when we won the podcasting award in 2015?
How did you feel when we didn’t win it this year?
How do you feel when someone catches you doing something you shouldn’t be doing?
How do you feel when your neighbours make a lot of noise or stop you from sleeping when you need to get up early the next day?
How did you feel when you heard about Brexit or Trump’s election victory?
What achievement do you feel proud of?
Is there anything you feel ashamed of?
How do you feel about Mickey Mouse?
What makes you feel bored?
When was the last time you felt surprised?

‘THE WHEEL OF FEELINGS’ AT INGLESPDCAST.COM/134

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think and how you feel! https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 


Nuestra tienda de descargas - FCE, business English, Audio courses: http://store.mansioningles.net/ 


Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast


We need $100
Our lovely sponsors are:


Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Stereotypes and Cultural Myths about the British


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC134_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Adverbial clauses, linkers and conjunctions - AIRC133

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

In this episode we're going to help you with Adverbial clauses, linkers, conjunctions etc

Audio feedback from Edu from Peru
You can sign up for free English chat at inglespodcast.com
We also publish the dates and the times of the online conversaiton chat on our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/mansioningles/) and on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ - @mansiontwit)

Listener Feedback: Bruno Schvidah from Brazil sent us an email.
My name is Bruno and I am from Brazil but recently living in Copenhagen!
My weak side has been "adverbial clauses and linkers" I would really like to go through that!
For now, I wish you all a great Friday!
All the best, Bruno

We're sorry it's taken us so long to answer your question, Bruno.
We spoke about some linking words in Episode 55 (but, even though/although, however, in spite of/despite) ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/06/14/linking-words-but-even-thoughalthough-however-in-spite-ofdespite-etc-shopping-expressions-airc55/ )

What Are Adverbial Clauses?
"An adverbial clause is a group of words which does what an adverb does.

Adverbial clauses (like all clauses) contain a subject and a verb. For example:

"I eat dark chocolate daily."
(normal adverb)

"I'm going to eat dark chocolate until you tell me to stop."
(adverbial clause = "until you tell me to stop")

More examples:
I never knew how wonderful life could be until I started podcasting.

I'll let you know as soon as I publish this episode.

Now that we've eaten, we can have some of that chocolate cake.

Adverbial clauses don’t have to speak about time. They can also be about contrast, cause and effect, condition etc.

Contrast:I had some chocolate cake even though I was full. (even though = aunque)

Cause and effect: I’ve put on weight this month because I’ve been eating so much cake.

Condition: I’m not going to Disneyland unless you come with me. (unless = a menos que, a no ser que)

More linkers:

In spite of / Despite - “I bought an iphone in spite of the price.” (in spite of/despite = a pesar de)
They go at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence.
“Reza arrived on time despite / in spite of missing the bus”


Instead of (en vez de, en lugar de)
“This year we’re having roast lamb for Christmas dinner instead of turkey.”


Although (aunque) / though / even though / in spite of the fact that (a pesar de que) - “Although/Even though/Though I was full, I had another piece of cake.”

"Even though" is more emphatic than "although".

“Though” can also go at the end of a second sentence in informal English:

These connectors are followed by a complete sentence. They can be placed at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence. If they are at the beginning we put a comma after the clause.

"I had another piece of cake, although I was full."

“In spite of the fact that the neighbours were making a noise, we decided to record this podcast.”

“Reza loves Berta. She rarely thinks about him, though.”

"I'm sorry, we don't have any chocolate cake. We've got some biscuits, though."

However (sin embargo) / nevertheless/nonetheless (no obstante) / even so (aun así)
At/Near the start of a second sentence:

“I was really tired. Even so, I decided to go out for a beer.” (sin embargo, aun así)

“Craig’s on a diet. However, he can’t lose any weight.”

“I didn’t like the price. Nevertheless/Nonetheless, I bought it.”

Or at the end of a second sentence in informal English:
“I didn’t like the price. I bought it, nonetheless.”

While / whereas (mientras que)
In the middle or at the start of a sentence:
“Our last podcast was really interesting, whereas/while this one is a bit boring.”
“While/whereas the last podcast was really interesting, this one is a bit boring:”

On the one hand / on the other hand (por un lado / por el otro lado)
Links two contrasting ideas. “On the one hand” can be omitted:
(On the one hand,) I think that technology has helped society in the areas of health, work, education etc. On the other hand we might be too dependant on technology and maybe to addicted to it as well.

On the contrary - al contrario
Some people say that people can’t change. On the contrary, I think they can!

We can use linkers to add information:

Moreover (además) / furthermore / besides (además) / in addition (to) (además (de)) / as well as (además de) / apart from (aparte de) / what’s more (además; lo que es más, y encima) / on top of that (además) / as well = too (también) at the end of a sentence

“In addition to jazz music, Craig also likes rap.”
Besides music and podcasting, what other hobbies do you have at the moment? - It's a nice day for a walk, and besides, I need the exercise.
I think you owe me an apology. Furthermore, you need to apologise to my wife.
Your company did not inform us of the building work in the hotel. Moreover, no compensation was offered.
Juan was at the meeting, as well as Sara and Maria.
‘Apart from Spanish, Reza also speaks French”.
“He's ugly and what's more, he's not very nice.”
"What a day! First I woke up late, then the car wouldn't start, and on top of that, I dropped my phone and broke it."
She likes tea. She likes coffee as well/too.


We can use linkers to show consequences and results:

As a result (of) (debido a,como resultado, como consecuencia) / therefore (por lo tanto, por eso) / consequently, as a consequence (en consecuencia, y entonces, y por eso) / for this reason

“Reza and I work very hard on this podcast. As a result, it’s becoming one of the most popular learning English podcasts in itunes.”
“I think, therefore I am.” - pienso, luego existo
“I wanted it; consequently, I bought it.”
“I don’t think I can help you develop this product, and for this reason I’m out.” - Shark tank

We can also use linkers to show reasons and causes:

Because (of) (a causa de, debido a) / as / since / seeing that / on account of / due to (debido a) / due to the fact that (debido a que) / owing to / owing to the fact that

As/Since/Because Craig loves Mickey Mouse (clause), he wants to visit Disney Land, Orlando.
Because of Craig’s love for Mickey Mouse (noun phrase, not clause), he wants to visit Disney Land, Orlando.


“Because of / on account of / owing to / due to our sponsor, italki we are able to continue with this podcast.”

Compare:
“We didn’t record podcasts yesterday due to* work.”
“We didn’t record podcasts yesterday due to the fact that* we were both working.”

(*also owing to and owing to the fact that)

“As / Since / Seeing that we’re hungry, we should break for lunch now.”

In order to = a more formal version of INFINITIVE / so as to
Theses conjunctions explain the purpose of something. They are more common in written English.
Reza and I started this podcast (in order) to help you improve your English.
We started our Patreon program so as to be able to pay for full transcriptions for these podcasts (go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast for more details)

All the same (de todas formas, a pesar de todo)
“They offered to pay me 30 euros per hour, but I turned down the job all the same.”

We can use some linking words to show the order and sequence of things

First of all / Firstly / To begin with / To start with / In the first place (en primer lugar, antes que nada)
Second / Secondly (en segundo lugar)
Third / Thirdly (en tercer lugar)
After that / Then (después de eso, después) / Next (luego)
Finally, Lastly (por fin, por último, finalmente)
Last but not least (por último, si bien no menos importante)

Linkers for summarizing

In short / To sum up / In conclusion (en resumen, para concluir, resumir)
All in all (en suma)
In brief (en resumen)
In short (en resumen)
On the whole (en general)


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Nuestra tienda de descargas: http://store.mansioningles.net/

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Thanks to our Patreon sponsors who are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
New sponsor: Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Feelings Vocabulary in English


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC133_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:38pm CEST

Puedes contestar las preguntas de comprensión y obtener ayuda con el vocabulario difícil en esta entrevista en inglespodcast.com   

You can answer listening comprehension questions and get help with difficult vocabulary in this interview at inglespodcast.com 

 

Vocabulary

urge = deseo, impulso
stipend = beca
funky (bars) = de moda, en la onda
it rings a bell = it seems familiar
(insurance) policy = póliza
to set up = instalar, montar
to struggle (to have difficulty) = costar
risky = arriesgado/a
to own = poseer, ser dueño de
to put (something) off = posponer
to go all in = echar el resto, ir con todo, apostar todo
overlap = coincidencia
to outsource = subcontratar
to scale = modificar la escala
deadline = fecha tope, fecha límite
to procrastinate = posponer, dejar para después
to run into someone = tropezarse con, encontrarse con 

Direct download: JackInterview_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:21pm CEST

In this episode we're going to help you improve your pronunciation with linking sounds. How words join together in connected speech - because WE DO NOT SPEAK LIKE ROBOTS DO WE?

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


Audio message from Jose from Mexico.

Audio message from Mamen: doubt and hesitate

Doubt
I doubt if we can help her. Why are you hesitating?
Doubt = dudar “I doubt if we’ll be making a special Christmas podcast this year.”
“I doubt that I’ll be eating turkey on Christmas day.”
“Did you have doubts about the consistency of this podcast when we first started?”


To doubt means to lack confidence in something; to disbelieve, question, or suspect.
To hesitate means to stop or pause before making a decision or doing something.
(dudar , vacilar)

Expressions with doubt
there is some doubt about it = sobre esto existen dudas
beyond doubt = fuera de duda
beyond all reasonable doubt = más allá de toda duda
to cast doubt on = poner en duda
to clear up sb's doubts = sacar a algn de dudas
to have one's doubts about sth = tener sus dudas acerca de algo
no doubt! = ¡sin duda!
to throw doubt on = poner en duda
without (a) doubt = sin duda (alguna)

to hesitate to do sth = dudar en hacer algo
“When I did a bungy jump, I hesitated before I jumped, but I had no doubt it was safe.”
Don’t hesitate to contact us, send Reza an email.
Don't hesitate to ask us = no vaciles en pedírnoslo, no dejes de pedírnoslo
To hesitate before doing sth = dudar antes de hacer algo
What do you hesitate before doing?

Connected speech. Why do native English speakers connect their speech? We try to say the most we can in the shortest possible time.

English is a stress-timed language. Spanish is a syllable-timed language.

1 - 2 - 3 - 4
1 and 2 and 3 and 4
1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4
1 and then a 2 and then a 3 and then a 4

CATS CHASE MICE
the CATS CHASE MICE
the CATS CHASE the MICE
the cats will CHASE the MICE
the CATS will have CHASED the MICE

"here and there" Do you pronounce the 'r' at the end of 'here'
"more examples"
"A doctor or a lawyer"
"We never ever thought we'd love podcasting"
"The biscuits are in the cupboard"
“This is a better episode than last week’s.”

Does the first word have to end in an ‘r’ sound, and the second begin with a vowel sound (like better and episode)?

law and order (‘r’ sound)
Pasta and cheese (‘r’ sound)

Go away (‘w’ sound)
No, I can’t (‘w’ sound)

She isn’t there (‘y’ sound)
Tea and biscuits (‘y’ sound)


Consonant + vowel sound (link the sounds together when a consonant is followed by a vowel)
I need it = I needit
Say a word = saya word
Read a text = reada text

Consonant + consonant (if the consonant is the same sound, just pronounce it once)
Big girl = bigirl
Best teacher = besteacher
Good day = gooday (or G’day if you’re Australian!)
Take the fast train = fastrain

I needto stopeating chocolate = I need to stop eating chocolate.
Playa songon ya violin = Play a song on your violin.
Are ya gonna sitdown or standup? = Are you going to sit down or stand up?


Other examples - dictation:

Wacha gonna do? = What are you going to do?

I’ve gotta geta lotavit = I’ve got to get a lot of it

She can’tavarrivedearly = She can’t have arrived early

Sendusanemail = send us an email

I’ve never bininafrica = I’ve never been in Africa ('Nicola's been in Benin, Africa')

Wadaya do? = What do you do? (for a living)

Pickitupoff the floor = pick it up off the floor

He mustav eatenitall = He must have eaten it all


A similar thing happens in Spanish also - cortado, cuñado, pringado

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 


Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Adverbial clauses, linkers and conjunctions

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC132_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:14am CEST