Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free
Lecciones para aprender y mejorar tú inglés. English lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and listening skills.

‘Would’ can mean soler. ‘Used to’ can mean soler also. So, how do you know when to use ‘would’ and when to use ‘used to’ when you speak about the past?

We’re going to tell you in this week’s episode of……..Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice message from Miguel about when to use would and used to.

Past episodes: ‘used to’, ‘be used to’ and ‘get used to’ in episode 6 - 31st Jan, 2014! ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/01/31/aprender-ingles-con-reza-y-craig-6/  )

‘Could’ and ‘would’ episode 71 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/10/04/go-and-come-could-and-would-reglas-para-leer-ingles-air71/  )

Pronunciation of ‘would’ in episode 36 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/11/26/more-clauses-and-phrases-pronunciation-goodwoodwould-vocabulary-the-car-airc36/  )

We use used to and would for past habits. Things that we don't do now or that are not true now.

I used to live in London.
I used to work in an office and I would get the bus to work every day.
What did you used to do in Belfast that you don't do now?

We can use ‘used to’ and 'would' to talk about repeated past actions:

When I was growing up in London I used to/would go to the park with my best friend and play football.
We'd cycle to the local park and we used to meet up with other kids to play for a couple of hours before lunch.
I used to want to stay longer, but Graham would always make sure that we were home in time for lunch.

We can use ‘would’ to talk about repeated past actions.

However, only ‘used to’ is possible when we talk about PAST STATES.

I used to live in London (XI would live in London.X)

I used to have a beard. (XI would have a beard.X)

We can use the past simple in the same way as ‘used to’ and ‘would’ to talk about repeated past actions.

Thanks to Lenuto69 from Spain for his (or her!) itunes review and 5 stars! Don't forget to subscribe on itunes even if you listen on the website or on our mobile app.

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Email from Isabel Soley Bech
Dear Craig and Reza,
This is just to thank you for your generosity in having this free podcast.
I am listening you (I’ve been listening to you) for at least one year and I enjoy and appreciate your advice very much .
I travel a lot for business and you are with me in planes, boats and trains.
I am a strong supporter of your programme and I recommended your podcasts to all my friends and acquaintances.
Please keep doing it!
Isabel

PS: Please detail me (Please give me details about) how I can sponsor you)

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti
Nikolay Dimitrov

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: A History of Britain in 20 Minutes

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC152_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:58pm CEST

In this episode we're going to help you with your news vocabulary. Do you listen to the news? Are you confused with those long words they use on the BBC? We’ll help you understand them in this episode.

Take your English to the next level with Mansión Inglés audio podcasts: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

Hi Reza and Craig ,
I´m Fancisco from El Ejido, Almeria and a long time fan . There is something that annoys me a lot and I´m wondering if other people feel the same .
The thing that annoys me is the bad use of English e.g. gonna instead of going to, wanna instead of want to, (and the most annoying one that we hear in every song these days) ain´t instead of aren't or isn't.
Does this annoy you or am I the only one? I am asking this because this is a subject that you haven´t yet covered in your podcasts. I would love if you could speak about this subject.
Kind regards,
Francisco Gutierrez.

Cortado - cortau / cuñado - cunyau - people are lazy!
Is it bad use or just different? What about written text messages?
‘Yeah’ instead of ‘yes’?
Should language be fossilized or is it constantly evolving and changing? - should there be a committee to protect language? - language police?

Voice message from Ignacio from Granada

Episode 85 (http://www.inglespodcast.com/2016/01/10/listening-to-the-news-news-and-currect-affairs-vocabulary-airc85/ )

Vocabulary often heard and read in the news

Remember that ‘news’ is an uncountable noun (some news / a piece of news / I have good news)

Revision
deadline – fecha límite, fecha tope
headlines – titular, cabecera
foreign correspondent – corresponsal extranjero, corresponsal en el extranjero
researcher – investigador, investigadora (do research, not make!)
to bury the lead
to cover a story – to report on an event or development
eyewitness reports
breaking news
newsreader (UK) / newscaster (USA) = presentador de noticias

More vocabulary
To axe - cut, cancel (axe = hacha) - More jobs have been axed at the Toyota plant.

To back (respaldar) - support, agree with. Will you back me if I ask for a pay rise?

To blast - criticise, condemn - The Prime Minister was blasted over his decision to cut government spending.

boost - increase - Huge boost in the economy

breakthrough - success - Breakthrough in fight against cancer

clash - disagree, fight - Famous author clashes with her publicist

crackdown - control, purge - Police crackdown on drugs

face (afrontar) - confront - We need to face facts / you have to face the music / Let's face it....

fury/outrage - extreme anger - Fury as police arrest famous footballer / Outrage as killer is set free

To go on the rampage - cause chaos, riot - Russian fans go on rampage after soccer match

To hit - affect - Elderly hit as temperatures drop

Plea (súplica) - request - Students’ plea for more government funding

pledge - promise - Valencia City Council pledges better transport service

probe - Investigate, investigation - Probe into paintings missing from museum

To purge - control, crackdown, get rid of - to purge something of - purgar algo de) purge on illegal drug use

To quit (dejar) - resign, leave - Politician quits education post

To raid / to swoop - attack - Police raid houses looking for terrorists - police swoop on drug den.

shake up - reform - Shake-up in police bureaucracy

To slam - criticise - Prime Minister slammed for backing the US.

To snub - avoid, fail to meet - Spanish Prime Minister snubs president

vow - promise - Home Secretary vows to reduce prostitution

We post BBC and VOA videos on our Facebook page at facebook.com/mansioningles 

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Another video from Mamen. If you want to see Mamen and the lovely view from here room in Biescas, go to inglespodcast.com/152 ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_aPyntL6ng&feature=youtu.be  )
She’s going to do more, like a Vlog - video log. We’ll publish them in the shownotes so that all of you listeners can get to know (conocer) each other.

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 


Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti

Nikolay Dimitrov

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: Would and Used To

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 Take your English to the next level with Mansión Inglés audio podcasts: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC151_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Today you’ll learn some English expressions about the sea.

First we havea an email from Becky
Hello guys!
Congrats for your podcasts, very useful!!
I'm going straight to the point.
I'm really very confused with the use of the apostrophe in this case:
80s - 80's - '80s - 80s'
I wanna get a tattoo with the following sentence: - 80s girl at heart- (meaning i'm a big fan of the eighties music, culture, fashion..everything, or that I should have be born in the eighties, feeling of belonging to another decade.
And i wanna make sure I dont get it in the wrong way 'cause it'll stay forever on my skin.
Could you please help me out here?
Thanks a lot!!
Becky

Voice message from Juan from Jaen (the World Capital of Olive Oil - known by locals as liquid gold.)

Comment on the blog from Roberto about episode 141 when we spoke about “Go to hell!” / “Get lost!” / “Get out of here!” - ¡Vete al carajo!
“From my point of view, the real meaning of the expression "Vete al carajo" comes from the navy, where "carajo" is that small basket at the top of a main mast. I think, "Crow's nest" is a suitable word for that place in English. Just to add another meaning of the Spanish word "carajo"
Not a good place to be for sure!
Cheers, Roberto”

I think they used to send out crows to find land. (crow - cuervo)

Thanks also to Marcelo Fernandez who sent an explanation and a picture of a crow’s nest on a ship. It’s in the show notes.

Other nautical expressions:

It’ll be smooth sailing from here on (also ‘plain sailing’) - easy progress. No big waves or rough sea.

Rock the boat - to do or say something that will upset people or cause trouble. Don’t rock the boat / Don’t make waves.

Like ships that pass in the night - people who meet for a brief but intense moment and then part, never to see each other again. Has that ever happened to you?

That ship has sailed - an opportunity that has passed or a situation that can no longer be changed. - You've missed the boat.

"three sheets to the wind" - someone who has had too much to drink. It comes from a term that originally described a ship in a complete mess, with its sails flapping and moving around in the wind.

"Taking the wind out of someone's sails" means beating them in an argument, or making them feel less confident in their actions.
Originally, the term referred to a naval maneuver. One ship would pass close to its opponent and block its access to the wind. - very useful tactic in battle.

Between the devil and the deep blue sea (between a rock and a hard place) - entre la espada y la pared - When you face a dilemma. - Going to the dentist - if you go you suffer, and if you don't go you suffer!

"knowing the ropes," - someone is competent at what they do. The statement, printed on a seaman's discharge, indicated that he knew the main uses of the ropes on a ship. Yet rather than indicating that the sailor was a master, the phrase meant that he was a novice who only knew the basics of sailing.

Not the only fish in the sea / There are plenty of fish in the sea. (not the only pebble on the beach). Plenty of other suitable people, especially for a romantic relationship.

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Video feedback from Andres, Aarón and Mikel from Costa Rica - Love the pineapples in the background!

https://youtu.be/NHxq0VPJgII 


Difference between ‘aware’ and ‘conscious’ (consciente, darse cuenta de)

Are you aware of/conscious of the 90 second time limit on Speakpipe?
Are you aware that you only have 90 seconds to speak (XAre you conscious that….X)

Conscious suggests being generally aware of the world around you.
Aware is more specific, you are aware of certain situations or facts. - Are you aware how important this podcast is?

Consciousness comes from one or some of the five senses. It’s a state (subconscious, unconscious - not awake, passed out - desmayado/a, inconsciente)
Awareness has more to do with the mind (self-awareness) - it’s the knowledge that something exists somewhere:

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com. Or send us a video or voice message like Mikel, Aaron and Andres from Costa Rica

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: Words in the News

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC_150_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:37pm CEST

In this episode we give Eugeni more feedback on his pronunciation and answer more of your comments and questions. This is Aprender Inglés on Reza y Craig

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Comment on the blog from Mar
Hi guys and congratulations for your great podcast.
The correct word to translate "milestone" is "hito". This is a word we usually use for business purposes: e.g. Hemos cumplido los principales hitos del proyecto.
We don't use "escalón" for that meaning.
Hope this helps.
Kind regards, Mar

“Moving to Spain was a milestone in my life.” What were some of the milestones in your life?

Voice message from Edgar Ubaldo from Mexico about the wall that Trump wants to build between the US and Mexico. Edgar says that he’s from "the place in the middle of the moon" (that's the meaning of Mexico according to some)
This is my opinion about immigration and the wall. I forgot to tell that never shall we pay that chingado muro! (we shall never pay - word order)
He also apologises for eating popcorn during his recording!

Excellent English and wonderful pronunciation!
I didn’t know that there were ex-pat communities of North Americans and Europeans in Mexico.
How dangerous is Mexico?
‘Prevent this from happening’
Please send us more messages - with popcorn!

An email from Javier from Tolosa who sent us a wonderful system for recording, learning and revising vocabulary.
“Hi Craig and Reza, how are you? This is Javier González from Tolosa,
I would like to share with you and with all your community one good practice that I use to improve my vocabulary.
Since I am very absent-minded, I have created this database in access to put the words I want to learn.
I explain all the rules of this application in the attached pdf.
I will send you too the database (empty) and a sample of the recorder.”

I couldn’t open the Microsoft Access file, but there were some nice examples in a pdf. In Javier’s system, you write the word or words you want to learn, the translation, the word family (noun, adverb, adjective etc), the sound (audio file) and example sentences.

Example: settle down - phrasal verb - establecerse, sentar cabeza - “I nearly got married, but I wasn’t ready to settle down.”

There is an option to review by double clicking in the “translation” field and then you can write the sentences. You can print out lists from the database.

Javier agreed to let us share his email address if you want to contact Javier: jabiergonzalez@yahoo.es

For learning vocabulary on your phone, I recommend the memrise app: https://www.memrise.com/

Which apps and methods are you using to learn, revise and remember vocabulary?

Audio message from Eugeni from Barcelona
“Let’s get down to business.” - to begin to get serious; to begin to negotiate or conduct business. “All right, everyone. Let's get down to business. There has been enough chitchat.”
to begin seriously doing what you need to do
Is Eugeni pronouncing the diphthong correctly in chair, bare, pair, there, parents, where, I don’t care?
Bird, flirt, shirt, skirt, nurse, first - this sound is a long schwa. Yes, you pronounce it well.

Voiced /z/, and unvoiced /s/ see and /z/ zoo

/s/ students, sit, sat, nice, decide, necessary, kiss
/z/ does, has, cruise, his, please, is, zebra, was

Advice and advise
Price and prize
Loose and lose
Niece and knees
Close and close
Peace and peas
Race and raise
Rice and rise

Italki ad read:
1­on­1
Native speakers
Convenient
Affordable
Italki gives 100 italki credits (ITC) to each paying student
For more information: inglespodcast.com/italki/    
We want to say thank you to italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig


Practice and learn the sounds of English, the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), on the Mansion Ingles website:

http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer01_3.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer04_6.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer06_6.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer08_6.htm  
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer10_7.ht
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer08_9.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer12_7.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer14_7.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer17_3.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer19_4.htm 

 

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti

We want thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138 and 139

On next week's episode: English Expressions from The Sea

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC149_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:51pm CEST

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC148_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC147_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

Direct download: AIRC146_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:39pm CEST

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC145_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC144_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC143_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:25pm CEST