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Lecciones para aprender y mejorar tú inglés. English lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and listening skills.

How important is personal space and body language when you are communicating? What’s the difference between alone, by myself and on my own? All this and more in this week’s episode of…..Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


Email from Alberto from Granada who is transcribing episodes for us
I saw recently a British TV drama called “The Fall”, starring Gillian Anderson, which is set in Northern Ireland. Don’t know if you’ve seen it, but I totally recommend it. I really loved the Northern Irish accent, you know, like every sentence is a question and the tone rises at the end. I found it very funny. Could you please ask Reza to do some Northern Irish accent for me, pleaseeee? I would really enjoy it!
Alberto

Voice message from Jesus from Valencia about subtitles when watching films and TV series
Jesus is another AIRCoholic)
“I’ve been studying English my whole life” / “I’ve been taking it seriously since…./for the last year and a half.”
Pronunciation of ‘searched’ only ‘t’ and ‘d’ sounds for the ‘ed’ ending (started, landed, farted, painted, needed, decided, waited)
I watch A BUNCH of movies
Dependant XaboutX - ON

Mamen from Biescas
On my own / by myself / alone / lonely
‘On my own’ - when you do stuff without help - “I painted the flat on my own”, “I fixed my bike on my own.”
‘By myself’ usually describes a situation, not when you do something.
https://quizlet.com/es  
https://www.memrise.com/  
https://www.duolingo.com/  


Voice message from Miguel (Michael) who doesn’t have a dog. He has a baby and a cat.

English people are very ‘close moved’ or ‘separative’ (stand-offish, aloof, distant, remote, detached, impersonal, withdrawn, reserved, uncommunicative, unforthcoming, unapproachable, unfriendly, unsociable, cool, chilly, cold, haughty, disdainful, uninvolved, unresponsive, indifferent, unconcerned, introverted)
They guard their personal space.

Would you sit at a table that was already taken in a crowded bar or cafe if there were empty seats?

Which cultures need a lot of personal space?

Which nationalities don’t necessarily need a lot of personal space?

How important is body language when you are communicating?

Should you kiss an English woman when you are introduced to her for the first time?

How important is a handshake? - Should you get the upper hand?
TED Talk by Allan Pease: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZZ7k8cMA-4 

Documentary on body language: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kY1K_IefjSA 

Do you kiss and hug men that you are close to?

What other cultural differences can you think of between the Spanish and the English?
- meal times and business hours
- siesta
- eating & drinking habits
- Christmas and New Year
- politeness & directness
- tutting (to say no) and hissing (to get someone’s attention)
- customer service

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have an opinion on personal space, or anything we've spoken about in this podcast?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast  

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 


Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Manuel García Betegón
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci
Manuel Velázquez
Néstor García Mañes
Juan Carlos

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid and Alberto from Granada for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions. Alberto has transcribed episodes 132 and 133, so we now have full transcriptions for episodes 131 to 142.

On next week's episode: Academic terms and vocabulary

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

Direct download: AIRC161_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

Are you studying for the Cambridge FCE exam? Need some help? We’ll be talking about that and climate change vocabulary on this week’s episode of…...AIRC

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice message from Andress and Lulu who are living in Yorkshire, UK
We spoke about the pronunciation of irregular verbs in episode 73 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/10/18/pronunciation-of-irregular-verbs-airc73/  )
We also spoke about the 'ed' endings on regular verbs in episode 60 ( https://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/07/19/the-ed-ending-on-past-regular-verbs-airc60-2/  )

XWe are living in Yorkshire since one year ago.X - We’ve been living in Yorkshire for a year. We came to Yorkshire a year ago. How long have you been living in Valencia? - Living in your flat? - Speaking Spanish?

Email from Alberto Diaz
Hello Craig and also Reza "The dynamic duo" hahaha
Please help me, I have a doubt
How we can realize what "time" has the verb could in the next sentence? (How can we know which tense the verb ‘could’ is in the next sentence?):
“I could go to the party.”
Past: Pude/Podía ir a la fiesta
Subjuntivo: Podría ir a la fiesta.
How (does) a native speaker figure out the exact tense (past or subjunctive)?
Thanks in advance

I could go to the party - It’s a possibility - Conditional - If I had a car, I could go to the party (but I don’t have a car, so I can’t)
Past ability - I could go to the (firm’s Christmas) party before I became an alcoholic (I was able to)

If I could (PAST-pudiera) run faster, maybe I could (CONDITIONAL-podría) be a famous athlete some day.

Voice message from Sira from Sabadell
I live near Barcelona (or 'next to')
I?m enjoying the podcast (or 'I'm enjoying IT')
“Thank you for all” - Thank you for everything

We already looked at some useful vocabulary about The Environment in Episode 96:
http://www.inglespodcast.com/2016/03/28/nature-and-the-environment-airc96/ 

Climate Change Vocabulary

Climate change - change in global weather patterns
Emissions - gasses and smoke from power stations and factories burning coal and from car exhaust fumes (carbon dioxide).
Greenhouse gases - gases that allow the sun’s radiation to pass through the earth’s atmosphere. They also trap heat and stop it leaving the atmosphere (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide)
The greenhouse effect - the effect that greenhouse gases have on the environment
Fossil fuels - gas, oil, coal etc
Ecosystems - natural habitats that support different kinds of animal and plant life, such as coral reefs.
Carbon footprint - The measure of greenhouse gas emitted by certain actions of humans or industries.
Extreme weather - flooding, typhoons/hurricanes, tornados, etc.
Flash flooding - very severe flooding which happens extremely quickly
Desertification
Deforestation
Rising sea levels
rising ice caps
Food/Water shortages
drought
Illegal logging - cutting down trees illegally
Heatwaves - periods of unusually hot weather
Climate change denier - person who denies/rejects the existence of climate change
The polar ice cap is melting
Floods, droughts and other extreme weather conditions lead to food shortages
The ozone layer protecting the Earth’s atmosphere is being damaged

Useful Expressions

As a result of….
Has an impact on...
Is a consequence of...
A rise in temperature could lead to…..
There’s a high risk of…
Long-term consequences

Voice message from Mamen (Thank you for the cheese!)

http://www.flo-joe.com/ 

http://www.examenglish.com/FCE/fce_listening.html 

http://www.cambridgeenglish.org/exams/first/  - You can change the language to Spanish at the top right hand side of the page (on a desktop)

La Mansión del Inglés First Certificate Course: http://store.mansioningles.net/downloads/first-certificate-course/  

http://www.getspokenapp.com/  

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast  

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed show notes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Manuel García Betegón
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci
Manuel Velázquez
Néstor García Mañes (new sponsor)
Juan Carlos (new sponsor) - How to Pass a Job Interview mp3 and pdf

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid and Alberto from Granada for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
Alberto has transcribed episodes 132 and 133, so we now have full transcriptions for episodes 131 to 142.

On next week's episode: Personal Space

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC160_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm CEST

 

Jose nearly died! How did that happen? Today we’ve got Jose’s True English Story and much, much more in…….Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

A voice message from Eugeni from Barcelona
Episode 149
(http://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/04/03/the-mexican-wall-and-eugenis-pronunciation-airc149/  )
"By no means will Eugeni stop listening to us!"
Keep on rocking!

Email from Antonio from Badajoz

Hi Reza and Craig! It's Antonio again with another question for you.
Watching movies in original version, I've realised that a lot of times, I can hear the expression "How would you like...?" followed, for
example, by either "a punch in the nose", or "being left by a woman that way" or something like that.
I gather it's some kind of complaint or threat, but, since I can't entirely get my head round it.
I'd love you guys to shed light on that if you please.

Thanks in advance! hugs from Badajoz!

1. For offering someone something that you think they will enjoy.
How would you like a glass of wine?
How would you like a free T-shirt?

2. For telling someone to consider how they would feel if something bad happened to them, especially if it has already happened to you.
How would you like a punch on the nose? (threat)
How would you like someone stealing your mobile phone?
How would you like it if I spilled beer on your trousers and didn't even apologise?
How would you like being left by a woman in that way?

Comment on the blog about the farming episode 155 from Nayabet who’s on a farm in New Zealand ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/05/14/farming-and-agriculture-airc155/  )
Thank you so much guys for this podcast, it will be really useful for me, in fact, I work on a dairy farm here in NZ and I’m a bit familiar with this (these) words but not with all of them.
So thank you once more.

Voice message from Lyan from Panama
Free courses and resources on Mansioningles.com and on our Facebook page at Facebook.com/mansioningles 

Jose’s True English Story
These stories began with episode 137 on how to tell a story in English:
http://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/01/08/how-to-tell-a-story-in-english-airc137/ 

Marcelo’s Story - Episode 157

Mamen’s story - Episode 148 http://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/03/26/mamens-true-english-story-and-more-idioms-airc148/ 

Jose’s Story

Vocabulary
Outskirts - alrededores
To flow - when liquid moves - fluir
Channel - a waterway (brazo, cauce, acequia) / canal
To drag - arrastrar
To overflow - derramarse
To slip - resbalarse
To yell - gritar - scream, shout
Edge - borde (bank - the land at river's edge - orilla
To drown - to die/kill in water - ahogar(se)
To scold - regañar - (to tell off)
To hug - abrazar

Comprehension questions
1. How old was Jose when the story happened?
2. Who had drowned in the chanal in the past?
3. How long did the incident take from start to finish?

Now listen to Jose’s story and answer the questions

1. How old was Jose when the story happened - 10
2. Who had drowned in the chanal in the past? - gypsy children
3. How long did the incident take from start to finish - 30 seconds

Corrections
XHere is my story, I hope you likeX (it)
XAll over us had forgiven playing close to the channelX (All of us had been forbidden to play close to the canal)
You know how children are (good word order)
Pronunciation of 'drown' and 'water'
XNowadays, the water is running undergroundX (runs underground)
XI realised that I was approaching to the tunnel.X - I realised that I was approaching the tunnel.

Transcript

I was living in the outskirts of Valencia, in the same city where I've always lived. Close to my home flowed one of the seven main channels in this city. Its water was used by a big paper factory, therefore the channel passed into the factory by a tunnel where there were two enormous wood blades rolling constantly in order to break up the things that the water dragged.

Back then, the children we played on the street all our free time and naturally all of us had forbidden playing (had been forbidden to play) close to the channel. But you know how children are because you have also been two of them not very long ago.

One day, we were around this forbidden place and the channel was so fast-flowing because of the previous rainy days, that water was on the edge, almost overflowing. I was walking on the edge admiring the speed and strength of the water when I slipped and fell into the water. My friends started to yell my name because they wanted to help me, but they couldn't because the water ran speedily and swept me along very quickly. I tried several times to reach the edge to get out from the water, but I couldn't.

I realized, that I was approaching to the tunnel dangerously close to the tunnel and I knew I had just one more chance to reach the edge, but I fell again. Then, I knew that I didn't have enough time to try it again. I was afraid because I was already entering into the tunnel and I knew that this meant dying like many gypsy children had already drowned.

However, the volume of the water was so high that my small body hit into the top of the tunnel and it stopped me for a few milliseconds and gave me time to reach the edge and get out from the water when my legs were already into (in) the tunnel. All of it happened just in around thirty seconds, no more.

When my parents were told about that, they didn't scold me. Just gave me a huge hug and they thank God THAT nothing bad had HAPPENED to me. So, I could survive this way from a certain death from drowning. Surely I had still a lot of things to do in my life.

Of course, we never went to play near the channel again, at least me.

A few years later this channel was covered because of the city development, and nowadays the water is running underground.

Well, this is my story. I hope you like (it).

Recap - What makes a good story, like Jose’s?
An accurate mix of verb tenses. eg past simple V past continuous V present perfect, etc.
A varied, interesting range of vocabulary, including expressions/idioms
Using detailed, descriptive language, especially adjectives and adverbs
Using linking expressions. eg. contrast (although, etc); addition (on top of that, etc.); time (afterwards, etc.); consequence (as a result, etc.); reference (as for, etc) and so on.
Using suspense, drama, mystery, shock, and other emotions that grab the reader’s attention

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a true English story to tell us?
Send us a voice message or record it on your computer and send it to us by email. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast  Emails to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed show notes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci
Manuel Velázquez
Néstor García Mañes

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid and Alberto from Granada for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions. Alberto has transcribed episodes 132 and 133, so we now have full transcriptions for episodes 131 to 141.

On next week's episode: Vocabulary: The Environment

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC159_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:06pm CEST

What were the last words of Elvis Presley? What did John Lennon say before he died? Famous last words and idioms this week on…….Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice Message from Alba Romá from Denia

Great idea to talk to your baby in English

Alex Perdel Aventura Bilingue: https://enclavedepodcast.com/2017/02/05/alex-perdel/ 

Alex’s Podcast: http://www.crecereningles.com/podcast/ 

iTunes review: Thank you! This is the best podcast I ever found. Good work! It's very helpful. I found you three weeks ago and now I'm addicted.
by Aldroper from Spain

Voice Message from Gabriel from Tijuana
He’s not disagreeing with us, he’s disagreeing with the wall.
Episode 149 Edgar Ubaldo’s message (http://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/04/03/the-mexican-wall-and-eugenis-pronunciation-airc149/  )

Voice message from Josep from Barcelona
The Phrase Finder: http://www.phrases.org.uk/ 

Kurt Cobain - Nirvana (1967-1994)
It's better to burn out than to fade away."

Elvis Presley (1935 - 1977)
Towards the end of his life, at his last press conference, amongst the final words he said in public were: "I hope I haven't bored you."
Elvis took an overdose of drugs and he said to his fiancée "I'm going to the bathroom to read."

John Lennon (1940-1980)
"I'm shot."

John Quincy Adams (1767–1848) - 6th President of the United States
"This, is the last of earth. I am content."

Frank Sinatra died after saying, “I’m losing it.”

Buddha (AKA Siddhattha Gautama)
circa 563BC - circa 483BC
"Work hard to gain your own salvation."
He also said, "Behold, O monks, this is my advice to you. All component things in the world are changeable."

George Orwell’s last written words were, “At fifty, everyone has the face he deserves.” He died at age 46.

Leonardo da Vinci was very modest. He said, “I have offended God and mankind because my work did not reach the quality it should have.”

Spike Milligan (1918-2005)
"I told you I was ill." (Epitaph written on his tombstone)

Sir Winston Churchill’s last words were, “I’m bored with it all.”

As he was dying, Alfred Hitchcock said, “One never knows the ending. One has to die to know exactly what happens after death, although Catholics have their hopes.”

Stan Laurel (1890-1965)
"I'd rather be skiing."

Groucho Marx’s final quip (witty remark) when he was dying was:
“This is no way to live!”

Ernesto “Che” Guevara’s last words before execution, after being taken prisoner:
“I know you are here to kill me. Shoot! You’re only going to kill a man!”

Johannes Brahms, German composer (1833 - 1897):
“Ah! That tastes nice! Thank you” after he had a small glass of wine.

Anna Pavlova, Russian ballerina, (1881 - 1931):
“Get my swan costume ready.”

Dylan Thomas, poet, (1914 - 1953):
“I’ve had 18 straight whiskies. I think that’s the record…”

Karl Marx, German philosopher, (1818 - 1883):
When asked by his housekeeper what he wanted his final words to be, he said: “Go on, get out! Last words are for fools who haven’t said enough!”

What would you want your last words to be?
How would you like to be remembered?
If you could leave a 'moral will', what would be in it? - What advice would you like to pass on?

Interesting idiomatic phrases

Put the cart before the horse - Reverse the accepted or logical order of things. - eat dessert before the main course or decide what to wear before you've been invited to the party.

'upside down', 'topsy-turvy' and 'inside out'.

Get off scot free - completely free from obligation, harm, or penalty
“The bank robbers got off scot free” - nothing to do with Scottish people. It comes from not paying taxes!

Take the Mickey - tease or make fun of (burlar) - Take the Mickey Bliss (Cockney rhyming slang - http://www.inglespodcast.com/2016/05/29/the-london-accent-and-cockney-rhyming-slang-airc105/  
NB. This expression has no connection with Mickey Mouse!

Back to square one - back to the beginning, start again

Over the moon - very happy or delighted

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed show notes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci
Manuel Velázquez
Néstor García Mañes

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 and 140.
Thank you also to Alberto Gómez from Granada who has kindly transcribed episode 132 on Linking sounds

If you would like all of our episodes transcribed, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
If you are a sponsor and have a job interview in English soon, there’s a free pdf and mp3 of our How To Pass a Job Interview e-book on the Patreon page

On next week's episode: Jose’s True Story

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

 

Direct download: AIRC158_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:56pm CEST

In this episode we're going to help you with adjective prefixes like UNbelievable and IMpossible, and Marcelo tells us his true story. Welcome to…..Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice message from Josep from Barcelona
Josep has passed CAE! - Congratulations!!!!

Are there rules for prefixes? - not really, but there are common patterns!
We spoke about word formation in general in episodes 59 and 61: http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/07/12/vocabulary-word-formation-airc59/  
http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/07/26/adjectives-of-character-airc61/ 

PREFIXES
Words that start with il- generally have the prefix il- (illegal, illogical), but there are exceptions.
Words that begin with ir- tend to have the prefix ir- (irrelevant, irrational, irregular, irresponsible)

SUFFIXES - at the end
People who do jobs: suffixes -er, -ist, -ant, -or, -ee (teacher, artist, shop assistant, professor)
Adjective suffixes: -ful, -less, -able, -ous, -ive. -itive, -y, -ible (helpful, useless, bossy)
Noun suffixes: -tion, -ment, -ness, -ity, -ance, -ence, -ship (education, clarity, friendship)

PREFIXES - at the start
1. Negative prefixes (mainly used for adjectives, but can be for verbs and nouns): un-, in-, -im, -dis, -ir, -il (untrue, disloyal, illogical)
2. Prefixes that give a specific meaning: anti- V pro-, down- V up-, hyper- V hypo-, pre- V post-, V micro- V macro-, sub- V supra-, inter-, V intra, multi-, V mono-, hetero- V homo-, under- V over-, trans-, ultra, semi-, non-, mini-, super- mega-...
(pro-government V anti-government, pre-war V post-war, mega-city, mini-skirt, international, ultra-modern, transatlantic, semi-skimmed..)


What’s the opposite?
Employed - unemployed
Relevant - irrelevant
Successful - unsuccessful
Possible - impossible
Trustworthy - untrustworthy
Noisy - quiet, noiseless
Comfortable - uncomfortable
Mature - immature
Respect - disrespect
Regular - irregular
Believable - unbelievable
Tolerant - intolerant
Satisfied - dissatisfied
Moral - immoral
Legal - illegal
Concerned - unconcerned
Lucky - unlucky
Reliable - unreliable
Modest - immodest
Obedient - disobedient
Honest - dishonest
Practical - impractical
Patient - impatient
Responsible - irresponsible
Perfect - imperfect
Experienced - inexperienced
Logical - illogical
Micro-economic - macroeconomic
Homosexual - heterosexual
Alcoholic (drink) - non-alcoholic
Pre-revolution(ary) - post-revolution(ary) Some words can be adjective or noun.
eg. a pre-revolution stamp. (Pre-revolution can be an adjective.)
Anti-war - pro-war. eg. The anti-war protestors had a demo. (anti-war is an adjective)
Overcooked - undercooked

Email from Marcelo from Buenos Aires
Hello Reza and Craig
Thank you very much for your podcasts. It is very nice to listen to them especially on Sunday evenings when everything seems to be dull.
I'm sending you a recording of something I experienced and wrote in English, as some kind of solace (consuelo).
I hope it to be useful for the podcast . I don't like my voice but that happens to a lot of people, as you said.
Regards
Marcelo from Buenos Aires

Vocabulary
Snack
Walmart
A (cold) shiver - escalofrío, temblor
Pickpocket
Accomplice - cómplice
Evidence - proof, evidencía
Plugged in - enchufado, conectado
To charge - cargar, recargar

Questions
1. Which two ways does Marcelo suggest for saving money before you go to the supermarket?
2. What did Marcelo think had been stolen from him?
3. What was the man doing while he was waiting in the queue?

Answers
1. Which two ways does Marcelo suggest for saving money before you go to the supermarket? - Make a list, eat before you go
2. What did Marcelo think had been stolen from him? - his mobile phone
3. What was the man doing while he was waiting in the queue? - opening a packet of crisps

Feedback
Great pronunciation, especially of words like snack, crisps, mobile, vegetable, hypothetical, charged
/h/ hypothetical, home - when I got ‘home’

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want to hear your true stories. Tell us anything, but it must be true!
Send us a voice message . https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast  or attach an audio file to an email. Send them to craig@inglespodcast.com If yo want to send Reza an email, send it to belfastreza@gmail.com.

How to Tell a Story in English - Episode 137 ( https://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/01/08/how-to-tell-a-story-in-english-airc137/  )

If you would like more detailed show notes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci 
Manuel Velázquez 
Néstor García Mañes

If you are a sponsor and have a job interview in English soon, there’s a free pdf and mp3 of our How To Pass a Job Interview e-book on the Patreon page Patreon.com/inglespodcast

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid and Alberto from Granada for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions. Alberto has transcribed episodes 132 and 133, so we now have full transcriptions for episodes 131 to 141.

 

On next week's episode: Famous Last Words

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC157_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:38am CEST

Holidays and Travel - AIRC156

Summer’s here! Today you’ll learn how to talk about holidays and travel. There’s lots of holiday vocabulary and useful expressions in this episode of…...Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice Message from Christian Avila from Mexico City
XI like too muchX - I like it very much
Xwonderful work that you have been doneX - have been doing all this time

Winner of our history quiz from episode 153 is francisco espínola from Ubeda (who suggested the podcast topic - obviously a history buff!)

Hi guys! thank you very much for having my suggestion taken into account, I´m delighted!.
Answering the quiz:
1. Name the UK’s first ever female Prime Minister. – Margaret Thatcher
2. Which British monarch ruled the longest period of time? – Elizabeth II (current Queen)
3. Which British king was given the nickname of “the mad king”? King George III of Great-Britain (1738-1820)
4. Who were the “Roundheads” and “Cavaliers”? -During the civil war:Roundheads=parliamentarians ; Cavaliers=Royalists
5. When was the Battle of Hastings?- 14 October 1066
6. Which famous British sailor defeated the Spanish Armada? – Francis Drake

Well, I could answer 1, 2, 5 and 6 by heart….3 and 4 by wikipedia ;)
If there are more AIRCoholics interested in History, I recommend the Terry Deary´s collection “Horrible Histories” (box of books): Twenty books of British history from the stone age to the second world war, written in a funny and amusing way.
( https://www.amazon.es/Terry-Deary/e/B001ITTQZW/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_3?qid=1494924246&sr=8-3  )

By the way, Reza: the word you were struggling to say was: MUJERIEGO (womanizer)
Thank you again, a big hug!

Hi to Raquel Gonzalez Herrero from Valencia who also got the questions right, except question 2. She said Queen Victoria, but the current monarch surpassed Queen Victoria in 2015.

We recommend Hardcore History - Dan Carlin: http://www.dancarlin.com/hardcore-history-series/ 

Voice message from Elsie from Bolivia - Hello!

iTunes reviews and 5 stars: Extremadamente didáctico, temáticamente variado y muy, muy entretenido. El mejor en su especie (the best of the bunch!).
by ArnauGrillo from Spain

Thank you! This is the best podcast I ever found. Good work! It's very helpful. I found you three weeks ago and now I'm addicted.
by Aldroper from Spain

Voice Message from Paco from Badajoz with an idea for a topic - Holidays and travel

Holidays and Travel

Air Travel Vocabulary episode 108 - (http://www.inglespodcast.com/2016/06/19/air-travel-vocabulary-airc108/ )

Revision
To go on a trip, to go/get away, to take a break for a few days
Airfare (bus fare, train fare, taxi fare etc)
To check in (aisle seat/window seat) – Fly – flight (domestic/international – short/long haul)
fly–flew–flown (to fly – verb / fly–noun = mosca/bragueta) “I have an open flight” – vuelo abierto)
Red-eye flight – early morning/night flight
Boarding pass - On board - a bordo, embarcar
Economy/Business/First class
Upgrade (subir de categoría)
Gate - puerta de embarque (actually means verja, reja, barrera - something you might find in a field or a garden)
Luggage/baggage allowance
Excess baggage
Hand luggage (carry-on)
To take off – to land / a take-off – a landing
Cabin crew – steward(ess) / air hostess / flight attendant
Runway - pista (de aterrizaje)
To taxi “The plane is taxiing before take-off”
To cruise “We are now cruising at 20,000 feet”
Jet lag - fatigue caused by plane travel
Baggage reclaim
Baggage carousel
Lost luggage

More vocabulary
Vacation (US) = holiday (UK) (on vacation/holiday)
peak/off peak - crowded
Sightseeing - to see the sights
scenery/landscape
Tour - package tour, tour guide
excursion - to go on an excursion

Places to stay
Hotel - to make a reservation/booking - full board/half board
Boutique hotel/Luxury hotel/ 5-star hotel/ 3-star hotel/budget hotel = low-cost hotel
B&B = Bed & Breakfast

https://www.airbnb.es/ 

Couchsurfing - https://www.couchsurfing.com/ 

Self-catering = you cook your own food
Guesthouse
Youth hostel
Caravan - motorhome - RV in American English (recreational vehicle)
to go caravaning
to tow a caravan
Tent - campsite - camping
Camping - to go camping in a campsite

Types of holiday
Beach
Snow
Trekking - adventure holidays
City break
Cruise
Long weekends
Sightseeing
A “dirty weekend”
Backpacking (backpack/rucksack)
Hitchhiking - to hitchhike = to thumb a lift

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Are you going on holiday this year? We'd love to hear about your plans.
What was your best (or worst) holiday?

Send us a voice message and tell us about your experience. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 and 140.

Thank you also to Alberto Gómez from Granada who has kindly transcribed episode 132 on Linking sounds

If you would like all of our episodes transcribed, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
If you are a sponsor and have a job interview in English soon, there’s a free pdf and mp3 of our How To Pass a Job Interview e-book on the Patreon page

Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci (new sponsor)
Manuel Velázquez (new sponsor)
Néstor García Mañes (new sponsor) - How to Pass a Job Interview mp3 and pdf- https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast  if you want to join our sponsors

On next week's episode: Marcelo’s True English Story and Adjective Prefixes

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC156_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:13pm CEST

What’s the difference between straw and hay? Cattle and poultry? To sow and to plough? You’ll learn some farming and agriculture vocabulary in this episode of Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice message from Tania from Ukraine living in Spain ("Thank you a million")

What is the fastest and easiest way to learn vocabulary?
Read!
Apps or notebook Memrise (flashcards) - Website: http://www.memrise.com/ 
Write words on Post-it notes and stick them around your flat or office
Duolingo - Website: http://www.duolingo.com/Duolingo 
(iOS /Android)
Use mnemonics (memory tricks) - ‘rathaus’
Research show that it's better to write down vocabulary and other information by hand rather than digitally.

Voice message from Juan from Argentina who’s in Australia

Farming and Agriculture

Barn - a farm building (granero) - Were you born in a barn? - Close the door! Have you ever been to a barn dance?
Cattle - animals like cows and oxen (buey) used for meat or milk
Poultry - chickens and turkeys, etc.
Livestock (ganado)
Dairy = made from milk - vaquería (farm), lechería (store, shop), dairy product (producto lacteo)
Crops - (cosecha, cultivo) We had a bad corn crop this year. Maize is an important crop. (sweetcorn, corn on the cob)
Crop rotation - The practice of rotating use of different fields from crop to crop each year, to avoid exhausting the soil.
Harvest - (cosecha, cosechar)
‘A bumper harvest’ = a very good harvest
Vintage - Cosecha de vino
To pick - (escoger, coger) pick flowers, fruit, grapes. You can pick grapes from a vine whick grows in a vinyard.
Drought - sequía - Did you know that Spain imported water by ship in 2008?
Drought in Spain’s northeastern region of Catalonia grew so severe in 2008 that Barcelona began importing water by ship from France.
Soil (tierra) erosion
Fertile land (producing crops)
Fertilize (fertilizar) - fertilizer (fertilizante)
Irrigation (irrigacíon, reigo)
Orchard (fruit trees) an apple orchard, a cherry orchard
ripe - maduro
Pesticide (chemicals that you spray on crops)
Hay - heno (dried grass)
Hay bale/bale of hay - paca de heno
Straw - paja
To plough - arar
To plant (plantar, sembrar) - to sow seeds
To sow - sembrar. “To sow the seeds of...doubt (duda)/unrest (inquietud)”
To reap - segar/cosechar. “To reap the rewards”= to benefit from good work/planning
"You reap what you sow"

Idioms

to farm something out - to send work to someone to be done away from one's normal place of business; to subcontract work. “We farmed the podcasting editing out.”

a funny farm – a hospital for people who are mentally ill
Example: My grandmother had to send my uncle to the funny farm when she couldn’t take care of him at home anymore.
Note (¡OJO!): This is a humorous or funny expression, but could be considered rude by some people.

I’m so hungry I could eat a horse – to be very hungry

until the cows come home – for a very long time
I could record podcasts until the cows come home!

the last (final) straw – the last of a series of events/annoyances/disappointments that lead a person to losing his or her patience/temper/hope
“He’s been late a few times, but this is the last straw!” “Yesterday my neighbours were partying until 3pm. This was the last straw. I called the police.
From the proverb: “It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back”

spring chicken – a young person
I’m no spring chicken!

to make hay while the sun shines – (hay = heno) to take the opportunity to do something when the time and conditions are right - Work was going really well, so I decided to make hay while the sun shines and keep working for another 3 hours.

don’t put all your eggs in one basket – don’t make everything dependent on one thing (same in Spanish)

to reap what you sow – every action has a consequence; what you do comes back to you one way or another. If you treat your friends badly, you won’t have any friends. ‘What goes around comes around)
This expression is usually used in a negative sense. (reap = cosechar “to reap the benefits of a situation = see the fruit)

to take the bull by the horns – to be brave and confront difficult situations
If you’re unhappy in your job, perhaps you take the bull by the horns and leave your company.

Discussion

Have you ever worked on a farm or picked fruit?
Have you ever driven a tractor?
Would you like to see more organic farming? Why (not)?
Are you worried about too much intensive farming?

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Are there any farms in your area? Have you ever worked on a farm like Juan?
Do you share Reza’s profound dislike and mistrust of GM (Genetically Modified) food?

Send us a voice message and tell us about your experience. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed show notes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 

Our lovely sponsors are:

Nikolay Dimitrov
Ana Cherta
Pedro Martinez
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lara Arlem
Maria Gervatti
Sara Jarabo
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Corey Fineran
Mariel Riedemann
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Agus Paolucci (new sponsor)
Manuel Velázquez (new sponsor)
Néstor García Mañes (new sponsor)

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 and 140.

Thank you also to Alberto Gómez from Granada who has kindly transcribed episode 132 on Linking sounds

If you would like all of our episodes transcribed, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast

If you are a sponsor and have a job interview in English soon, there’s a free pdf and mp3 of our How To Pass a Job Interview e-book on the Patreon page
https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Direct download: AIRC155_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:12pm CEST

What’s the difference between who, who’s whose and whom? That’s what you’ll learn in this episode of…….Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig


Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Reza is on top of the world and as fit as a fiddle.

Audio Feedback Janete Hernandez from Mexico
I love your accent too, Janete!

Audio feedback from Ana from Mexico (so many audio messages from Mexico - Thank you! Please keep sending your voice messages. You will hear them eventually!)

Who Whose Who’s and Whom

To understand how to use 'who', 'whom' and 'whose' you first have to understand the difference between subjects, objects and possessives.

The subject does the action:
She works in a cafe.
He likes cooking.
They bought a new car.

The object receives the action:
Everyone likes him.
I don’t know her.
They didn’t speak to us.

Possessives tell us the person something belongs to:
His new mobile phone is really expensive.
I like his sunglasses, not hers.
We’re selling our flat.

'Who' can be a subject pronoun like 'he', 'she' and 'they' or object pronoun like 'him', 'her' and 'us'.
We can use 'who' to ask which person did an action or which person is in a certain state (subject):
Who wrote the email?
Who is that girl over there?
Who is getting the drinks?

We can also use ‘who’ to ask which person received an action (object):
Who are you going to invite to the wedding?
Who did you meet last night?
Who has she chosen to go with?

'Whom' is an object pronoun like 'him', 'her' and 'us' used with formal English. We use ‘whom’ to ask which person received an action. It isn’t common to use whom. Most native speakers use ‘who’ instead.
Who(m) are you going to invite to the wedding?
Who(m) did you meet last night?
Who(m) are they going to choose to manage Arsenal?

‘Whom’ MUST go after a preposition, NOT ‘who’, with formal English:
The lady with whom Reza was dancing was the Marquise (=Marquesa)
‘For whom the bells toll’ is Hemingway’s famous novel set in the Spanish Civil War.
‘To whom it may concern’ is typical at the top of a reference.

When the pronoun and preposition are separated and/or the pronoun comes first, ‘who’ MUST be used, NOT ‘whom’:
The woman who Reza was dancing with must have been a bit tipsy! (tipsy=un poquito bebida)
Who did they sell their old car to yesterday?
Young boy: “Can I go to the cinema tonight, mum?”
Mother: “Who with?”


'Whose' can be a possessive adjective, like 'her' and 'our', or possessive pronoun, like ‘hers’’ or ‘ours’ . We use 'whose' to find out which person something belongs to.
Whose glass is this?
Whose is this jacket?
I see a book on my chair. Whose is it?
Whose are these?

Don’t confuse whose and who’s = who is. They’re pronounced the same:
Who’s(= Who is) that ringing the doorbell?
That’s the person who’s(= who is) coming with me to Brian’s party.

My Dear friends:
This is Edgar Ubaldo from Mexico again. - Question about the Mexican Wall ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2017/04/03/the-mexican-wall-and-eugenis-pronunciation-airc149/ )

According to Longman - "TOEFL Preparation Course", it is possible to use inversion (V + S) with negative expressions such as: never, hardly ever, etc.

Because of that, and following my previous message, I wrote never shall we pa y for that wall. Nevertheless, I won't use this expression in an English Test or a normal conversation. Is this okay? or should I not use inversion in cases like this?

Additionally, in a book I'm reading "A Tale of Two Cities", there are some questions that don't follow the right word order:

"There are two other points on which I am anxious to be instructed. I may go on?"
"You are sure that he is not under too great a strain?"
"It would show itself in some renewal of this disorder?"

I believe that it was written like that on purpose, but I don't know if there are any difference in meaning or intention.

And finally friends, especially Reza, I would like to know the grammar behind this expression (taken from the same book):

"He approached his second and last point. He felt it to be the most difficult of all; but, remembering his old Sunday morning conversation with Miss Pross, and remembering what he had seen in the last nine days, he knew that he must face it"

Why is it Past Simple + Modal in present to talk about something that happened in the past?.
I constantly try to express the same and said: I knew I should have faced it or something like that.

(Reza’s explanation:”he knew that he had to face it" is the typical, everyday way to say it in modern English, because ‘had to’ is the past of ‘must’.
However, it’s quite common to use ‘must’ instead of ‘had to’, even though it’s the past (“he knew that he must face it”), to make the story sound more lively and real,
as if it were happening now, in the present, especially in storytelling/literature.)

Audio feedback from Evelin Fernandez - advice for TOEFL test - speaking

20 minutes - 6 questions
The first two are about familiar topics, and the other four are about short readings, lectures, and conversations.
You will have a short amount of time after you read each question to prepare your response. Then you will be given a short amount of time to speak into a microphone.
You will be evaluated on "delivery, language use and topic development".

We spoke about the TOEFL and IELTS test in episode 68 ( https://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/09/13/the-toefl-and-ielts-test-airc68/ )

TOP TIPS FOR TOEFL

- time yourself
- take notes (bullet points)
- breath deeply
- practise speaking in noisy places and recording yourself
- image you are speaking to a good friend as you speak into the microphone


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti
Nikolay Dimitrov
Agus Paolucci
Manuel Velázquez

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: Farming and agriculture


Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Direct download: AIRC154_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:03pm CEST

Today we’re going to try and give you a complete history of Britain in 20 minutes - without all the boring bits!

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Welcome to Aprender Inglés with Reza and Craig. I’m …..and I’m….
With over 45 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.

Hello to Gustavo Gonzalo (AKA - also known as - Don Quixote from La Mancha) who sent a lovely email from ‘deep Spain’ - thanks for listening.

An email from Raixa Pérez from Valladolid who’s going to Ireland this summer with her family.
Hello Reza and Craig,
I found your great, funny and incredibly useful podcast some months ago and I listen to you almost every working day, on my way to work.
I passed the first certificate exam many years ago, around 20 or maybe more!!
Your podcast is helping me a lot to refresh grammar, vocabulary, listening etc
I listen to Luke's podcast in order to hear different accents, but your podcast is the most pedagogic.;)
Next summer we will go to Ireland (we’re going to Ireland), to Cork, for 2 weeks to Learn English in a family. The children play in English and we attend English lessons...in the mornings.
Reza, I am afraid we couldn't visit your great country, The North of Ireland (we won’t be able to), but could you give us some advice about Cork: What to visit, What dishes to eat...?
I haven't written in English for many, many time (a long time/many years).. I am " oxidized" (rusty).
Big hugs from Valladolid.
And thank you very much in advance.
Raixa Pérez

Look out for the colourful buildings. Ask for Murphy's Stout, not Guinness in Cork.
Seafood like mackerel, mussels and Oysters will be good in Cork, also milk, butter, buttermilk, Irish bread and a good fried breakfast.
White pudding is a typical dish in this part of Ireland.

Email: Rafael Alba Garcia
Hola Craig, estoy oyendo vuestro podcast y alguien (no recuerdo el nombre) ha dado un significado de "carajo" y como yo ya opiné al respecto y como no coincide con lo que yo os dije,
te pongo lo que dice el diccionario de la Real Academia de la lengua.....(solo pongo la primero acepción) que coincide con lo que yo os dije......
1. m. malson. miembro viril. (es malsonante).... ya lo dejo que no me gusta ponerme muy pesado....saludos

Voice message from Francisco Espínola - Úbeda

A Short History of Britain

The Celts settled in Britain around 700 BC

The Celts are ancestors to many people in Scotland, Wales and Ireland (and also England).

A famous Celt is Boadicea. She fought against the Romans. The Celts often had female leaders.

The Romans occupied most of England and Wales in 43 AD. They built a wall along the Scottish border, called Hadrian’s Wall (after the Roman Emperor Hadrian) to keep the barbarians in the North.

The Romans stayed in Britain for a long time. By the 5th Century, they were losing control and the Angles and the Saxons attacked Britain.

Then, in the 9th century the Vikings came from Scandinavia attacking monasteries, killing monks and stealing gold and silver.

The Vikings stayed in Britain for almost 300 years. They were finally defeated by the Saxon king, Alfred (Alfred the Great) - the first great Anglo-Saxon King of England.

In 1066, the Norman invaders from France, under William the Conqueror, defeated the Anglo-Saxon King Harold and took control of the kingdom, introducing many French words and customs.

During the Middle Ages, England became one of the strongest nations in Europe.

King Edward l was the first English King who conquered Scotland (to conquer - conquistar).

Edward lll conquered Wales and Ireland.

In 1509, King Henry VIII took the throne (trono - Game of Thrones). He brought in (introduced) Protestant reform and the Catholic Church lost control over England. He earned a lot of money from the reform and was able to get divorced (from Catherine of Aragon)

Henry's daughter, Elizabeth l, was the first Queen of England. She defeated the Spanish fleet/armada and created the first English colonies in America.

The English Civil War began in 1642. The parliament beat Charles l and England became a republic. Indeed, many people forget that England was briefly a republic, just like Spain!
Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector. The King was executed.

On July 4th, 1776, 13 colonies declared independence from Britain. General George Washington broke the British army in 1783 and the US got its independance.

Napoleon Bonaparte became Emperor of France in 1805 and declared war on Britain.

Britain decisively beat the French at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, after various previous battles against them, including in Badajoz and Salamanca, Spain. Britain's forces were led by The Duke Of Wellington.

As we pointed out in more detail in episode 52 of Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig: (http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/05/24/phrasal-verbs-with-up-england-britain-great-britain-and-the-uk-gerunds-and-infinitives-asking-for-directions-airc52/ )

All of Ireland used to be part of the United Kingdom (of Great Britain & Ireland) until 1922. Then the Republic of Ireland broke away while Northern Ireland remained in the UK. Thus, the historical love-hate relationship between GB and Ireland, whose histories are closely connected.

Italki ad read:
1­on­1
Native speakers
Convenient
Affordable
Italki gives 100 italki credits (ITC) to each paying student
For more information: inglespodcast.com/italki/
We want to say thank you to italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We’ve got a quiz for you about the UK.
Send us a voice message or an email with the answers. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast  Emails: craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

You can find the questions at inglespodcast/153 

The first listener who correctly answers all 6 questions gets a special mention on the show.

LISTENER QUIZ -
1. Name the UK’s first ever female Prime Minister.
2. Which British monarch ruled the longest period of time?
3. Which British king was given the nickname of “the mad king”?
4. Who were the “Roundheads” and “Cavaliers”?
5. When was the Battle of Hastings?
6. Which famous British sailor defeated the Spanish Armada? (Sorry about that, amigos!!)


If you would like more detailed show notes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti
Nikolay Dimitrov

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: Who, whose, who’s and whom

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC153_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:18pm CEST

‘Would’ can mean soler. ‘Used to’ can mean soler also. So, how do you know when to use ‘would’ and when to use ‘used to’ when you speak about the past?

We’re going to tell you in this week’s episode of……..Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice message from Miguel about when to use would and used to.

Past episodes: ‘used to’, ‘be used to’ and ‘get used to’ in episode 6 - 31st Jan, 2014! ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/01/31/aprender-ingles-con-reza-y-craig-6/  )

‘Could’ and ‘would’ episode 71 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/10/04/go-and-come-could-and-would-reglas-para-leer-ingles-air71/  )

Pronunciation of ‘would’ in episode 36 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/11/26/more-clauses-and-phrases-pronunciation-goodwoodwould-vocabulary-the-car-airc36/  )

We use used to and would for past habits. Things that we don't do now or that are not true now.

I used to live in London.
I used to work in an office and I would get the bus to work every day.
What did you used to do in Belfast that you don't do now?

We can use ‘used to’ and 'would' to talk about repeated past actions:

When I was growing up in London I used to/would go to the park with my best friend and play football.
We'd cycle to the local park and we used to meet up with other kids to play for a couple of hours before lunch.
I used to want to stay longer, but Graham would always make sure that we were home in time for lunch.

We can use ‘would’ to talk about repeated past actions.

However, only ‘used to’ is possible when we talk about PAST STATES.

I used to live in London (XI would live in London.X)

I used to have a beard. (XI would have a beard.X)

We can use the past simple in the same way as ‘used to’ and ‘would’ to talk about repeated past actions.

Thanks to Lenuto69 from Spain for his (or her!) itunes review and 5 stars! Don't forget to subscribe on itunes even if you listen on the website or on our mobile app.

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Email from Isabel Soley Bech
Dear Craig and Reza,
This is just to thank you for your generosity in having this free podcast.
I am listening you (I’ve been listening to you) for at least one year and I enjoy and appreciate your advice very much .
I travel a lot for business and you are with me in planes, boats and trains.
I am a strong supporter of your programme and I recommended your podcasts to all my friends and acquaintances.
Please keep doing it!
Isabel

PS: Please detail me (Please give me details about) how I can sponsor you)

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti
Nikolay Dimitrov

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: A History of Britain in 20 Minutes

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: AIRC152_FinalCut.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:58pm CEST